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Wednesday, October 22
 

17:00 CEST

ISRII Board of Directors Meeting
BY INVITATION ONLY
Dinner follows at 7:30 PM at Alma del Temple, http://www.almadeltemple.com/

Speakers
GA

Gerhard Anderson

Professor, Linkoping University
HR

Heleen Riper

Professor eMental-Health/ clinical psychology; Chair; President, Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Triple-E; ISRII
avatar for Lee Ritterband

Lee Ritterband

Professor, University of Virginia


Wednesday October 22, 2014 17:00 - 19:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO
 
Thursday, October 23
 

07:30 CEST

Registration Desk Open
Thursday October 23, 2014 07:30 - 18:00 CEST
TBA

09:00 CEST

WORKSHOP 1: Creating and Evaluating Digital Interventions Using LifeGuide and UBhave
This workshop provides an introduction to the freely available open source LifeGuide and UBhave software, illustrating how you can use it to develop web and phone-based interventions and analyse usage.

After this presentation, participants shall be able to:
  •  Appraise whether the LifeGuide will be a suitable tool to help them to develop and evaluate their own Internet-based intervention.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of how to use LifeGuide for developing interventions, including tailoring intervention content.
  • Describe how LifeGuide can be used to trial an intervention, including automated randomization and follow-up and monitoring of website usage.


Thursday October 23, 2014 09:00 - 12:00 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:00 CEST

WORKSHOP 2: The Use of mHealth in Mental Health Reseach and Practice: From Design to Evaluation
The goal of the workshop is to describe the use of mobile tools in mental health research and practice, focusing on basic issues related to the design and evaluation of mobile applications for mental wellbeing.

Speakers

Thursday October 23, 2014 09:00 - 12:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:00 CEST

WORKSHOP 3: CANCELLED
Thursday October 23, 2014 09:00 - 12:00 CEST
CANCELLED

09:00 CEST

WORKSHOP 4: CANCELLED
***This workshop has been cancelled. Workshop 4 registrants can chose another workshop during registration on Thursday, 23 October***

Chronic pain is one of the most frequent causes of sick leave and disability. It includes medical conditions such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic low back pain. Treatments of this condition consider structural and functional alterations as well as psychological and social factors. While cognitive behavioural interventions (CBT) have been successful in treating chronic pain (Hoffman et al., 2007; Glombiewski, 2010), effect sizes are still modest and most studies do not include long-term follow-ups. One possible way to improve assessment and obtain longer-term, better therapeutic outcomes of CBT intervention programs for chronic pain is to include new therapeutic components and to promote review of the therapy sessions outside the clinic, both during the therapy program and once the program is finished. This can be achieved by using information and communication technologies (ICT). This workshop presents ICT applications developed by our team, Labpsitec (Universitat Jaume I and Universidad de Valencia), with the support of Labhuman (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia), for the improvement of assessment protocols and psychological treatments for chronic pain. We have developed a VR component to support a therapeutic component which aims to promote positive emotions and motivation to enhance the activity pacing. We also have developed an Ecological Momentary Assessment application that runs in smartphones for the assessment of key variables in chronic pain. Finally, we have developed an Internet-based intervention to promote the possibility of systematic training in self-management strategies. Patients learn and practice therapeutic strategies in their natural environment and on their own, promoting self-management and self-efficacy. These applications have been developed and tested within different projects with a joined effort of our team and other teams sited at Hospital General de Castellon (Dr. Belmonte) and Hospital Arnau de Vilanova de Valencia (Dr. Domenech).


Thursday October 23, 2014 09:00 - 12:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO 3RD FLOOR (1) Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:00 CEST

WORKSHOP 5: Using R and RStudio for Modern E-mental Health Research: A Bring-Your-Laptop Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

R is a freely available statistical software package. Its versatility, extensibility and active support community make it a valuable addition to the analytical toolbox of the e-mental health researcher. However, R is also known for its intimidating steep learning curve, which presents a clear barrier to its practical adoption. This one-day, bring-your-laptop workshop will kick-start participants using R. No prior experience with R is assumed. Workshop participants will work their way from the very basics – installing the software – to the application of advanced extension packages for complex ecological momentary data analysis.

The workshop is structured in three parts. Part one focuses on the basics. Participants will learn how to download, install and run R and RStudio, a popular integrated development environment for R. R’s syntax, script editing and basic plotting procedures are covered, and participants are introduced to specialized extension packages for clinical analysis. Next, in part II, participants learn how to use R to conduct common statistical procedures such as ANOVA, multiple regression, power-analysis, and effect size calculations. In addition, participants are shown how to use the Lattice package to produce high-quality graphics for manuscript preparation. Finally, part III provides a practical introduction in advanced statistics such as multi-level repeated measures regression analysis and data mining approaches.

After this presentation, participants shall be able to:
  • Use R and RStudio for clinical data management, statistical analysis and graph production. 
  • Locate, install and use R extension packages dedicated to clinical analysis.
  • Estimate multi-level models and apply data mining techniques.
NOTE: To ensure a quick start of the workshop, participants are requested to try to install R and RStudio, and JAGS (in that order) on their laptop by visiting the software download sections at http://www.r-project.org, http://www.rstudio.com/ and http://sourceforge.net/projects/mcmc-jags/. All software applications are free, and available for both Mac and Windows OS.


Thursday October 23, 2014 09:00 - 12:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO 3RD FLOOR (2) Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:30 CEST

Elsevier Editorial Board Meeting
BY INVITATION ONLY

Thursday October 23, 2014 09:30 - 11:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO 3RD FLOOR (1) Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:30 CEST

Poster Session 1 Set Up
Abstracts: 0022, 0024, 0037, 0040, 0049, 0076, 0084, 0088, 0090, 0093, 0107, 0108, 0110, 0113, 0115, 0133, 0152, 0156, 0160, 0163, 0166, 0171, 0176, 0177, 0188, 0192, 0214, 0215, 0228, 0270

Thursday October 23, 2014 09:30 - 11:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

12:00 CEST

Lunch on Your Own
Thursday October 23, 2014 12:00 - 13:00 CEST
University of Valencia La Nau

13:00 CEST

Welcome and Presidental Address
Heleen Riper, ISRII President

D. Esteban Morcillo, Chancellor (Rector) of Universitat de Valencia

Dr Gisele Roesems-Kerremans, Deputy Head of Unit, Health and Well-Being, European Commission

Member of Valencia Government



Speakers
HR

Heleen Riper

Professor eMental-Health/ clinical psychology; Chair; President, Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Triple-E; ISRII


Thursday October 23, 2014 13:00 - 14:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Plenary Lecture: The Future of Internet Interventions for Common Mental Disorders
It is well-established that Internet interventions are effective in the treatment of common mental disorders and there are no or only minimal differences with face-to-face treatments. This gives many new opportunities to improve efficiency of mental health care and reaching populations that do not make optimal use of existing services. At the same time, however, the number of patients who benefit from existing treatments is relative small, and simply replacing treatments with Internet-based treatments and making them available through other channels will not sufficiently increase the number of patients who benefit from treatment. Therefore, we have to find other ways of improving mental health care. One strategy would be to further increase efficiency, for example through developing self-guided treatments that are as effective as guided self-help or face-to-face treatments. Another strategy would be to develop personalized treatments, assuming that some patients benefit more from one treatment than from another. In this strategy so-called “individual patient data” meta-analyses are important. In these meta-analyses the primary, patient-level data of multiple studies are integrated into one big dataset, with sufficient statistical power to examine who benefits from which treatment. In this presentation some examples are given how this may improve treatment selection and help with the further reduction of the disease burden of common mental disorders. 

Speakers
PC

Pim Cuijpers

Pim Cuijpers is the Professor of Clinical Psychology at the VU University Amsterdam


Thursday October 23, 2014 14:00 - 14:30 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:40 CEST

Session 1A: Symposium: Interactive Technology-Driven Interventions for Smoking Cessation: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Background: Cigarette smoking, the most common form of nicotine use, is the single most preventable cause of death in the world and continues to be a serious problem. Beyond intervention effectiveness, reach and retention are major challenges of smoking cessation interventions. Internet and mobile phone technologies have the potential to deliver individualized and continuous smoking cessation support to large proportions of the population that may easily be accessed, independent of time and place.

Purpose: Within the symposium the following recent technological developments and results concerning technology-driven interactive programs for smoking cessation will be presented by psychologists and computer scientists:

1. The results of a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of the fully-automatic text-message based program SMS-COACH for smoking cessation in vocational school students.

2. The aims and architecture of the MOBILE-COACH, a modular and extendable open-source software that allows creating and evaluating fully-automatic mobile-based intervention programs for changing various health behaviors and that will be used for the development of a revised version of the SMS-COACH.

3. The aims and intitial results of the Internet program YOUTURN for smoking cessation in occupational Settings, which offers social support and the opportunity to gain real money in case of long-term smoking abstinence.

Within the subsequent discussion we will address, among other things, the necessity of a close collaboration of computer and health scientists in order to establish stable and extendable programs for health promotion.

Abstracts: 0048, 0150, 0153, 0162

Efficacy of a Text Message-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention for Young People: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
Severin Haug1,  1Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction at Zurich University, Zurich, Switzerland

The MobileCoach – An Open Source Solution for Behavioral Change Interventions
Andreas Filler1,2, Severin Haug3, Tobias Kowatsch4,  1Health-IS Lab, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland, 2Trier University of Applied Sciences, Environmental Campus Birkenfeld, 55761 Birkenfeld, Germany, 3Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction, 8031 Zurich, Switzerland, 4Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland

The YouTurn Program - Using Principles from Behavioral Economics and an Online Tool to Support Smoking Cessation
Flavius Kehr1, Matthias Frieden2, Tobias Kowatsch1,  1Institute of Technology Management, University of St. Gallen, 9000 St. Gallen, Switzerland, 2YouTurn, 8055 Zürich, Switzerland

Short-term results of a Web-based multiple-session attentional bias modification training for smokers
Iman Elfeddali1, Hein de Vries1, Catherine Bolman2, Thomas Pronk3, Reinout Wiers3,  1School for Public Health and Primary Care (Caphri)/Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 2Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands, 3University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 


Moderators
Thursday October 23, 2014 14:40 - 15:40 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:40 CEST

Session 1C: Health Behavior Intervention (Abstracts: 0029, 0039, 0050, 0070, 0074)
Efficacy of a Web-Based Computer Tailored Physical Activity Intervention Based on Motivational Interviewing and Self-Determination Theory
Stijn Friederichs1, Anke Oenema2, Catherine Bolman1, Lilian Lechner1, 1Open University of the Netherlands, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands, 2Maastricht University, Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Effectiveness and Outcome Moderators of Computer-Based Interventions in Health Education: A Systematic Review of Meta-Analytic Studies
Leontien Vreeburg1, René Diekstra2, Clemens Hosman3, 1The Hague University, Den Haag, The Netherlands, 2The Hague University, Den Haag, The Netherlands, 3Maastricht University /Radbout University Nijmegen, Maastricht/Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Development and Usability Testing of an Internet Intervention to Reduce Alcohol-exposed Pregnancy Risk
Karen Ingersoll1, Lee Ritterband1, Christina Frederick1, Michelle Hilgart1, Gabe Heath1, Steve Johnson1, 1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Internet-Based Individually vs. Group Guided Self-Help Treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Thomas Berger1, Ava Schulz1, Timo Stolz1, 1University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Acceptability and Feasibility of an eHealth Self-Regulation Intervention for the Promotion of Physical Activity and Healthy Nutrition
Jolien Plaete1, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij1, Maïté Verloigne1, Geert Crombez1, 1Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Thursday October 23, 2014 14:40 - 15:40 CEST
Room: AULAS SEMINARIO

14:40 CEST

Session 1B: Translation in the Digital Age (Part 1)
The first symposium will commence with an outline of the core principles and processes of translation and the Black Dog Institute Translational Model by Professor Helen Christensen, Director of the Black Dog Institute. Three presentations about different BDI eHealth projects will follow, each illustrating aspects of the Black Dog Institute Translational Model. The symposium will conclude with a discussion led by A/Professor Judy Proudfoot about common hurdles and pitfalls in translation and dissemination.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this symposium, participants will:
- Understand the core processes and outcomes of mental health translation
- Be familiar with the Black Dog Institute’s translational model
- Be aware of three eHealth projects and their role in mental health translation
- Have an appreciation of common pitfalls and hurdles in research translation

Abstracts: 0066, 0122, 0128

The Y-Worri Project: An evaluation of the e-couch Anxiety and Worry program in schools
Alison Calear1, Helen Christensen2, Philip Batterham1, Andrew Mackinnon3, Kathleen Griffiths1,  1The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 2University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 3University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Application of mHealth for online and offline social connectedness
Mark Erik Larsen1, Tjeerd Boonstra1, Helen Christensen1,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

The myCompass Project: Translating and disseminating a self-guided public health program via mobile devices and the internet
Judy Proudfoot1, Alexis Whitton1,2, Janine Clarke1,2,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia



 


Moderators
Thursday October 23, 2014 14:40 - 16:10 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:40 CEST

Afternoon Break with Posters and Exhibitors
Thursday October 23, 2014 15:40 - 16:10 CEST
TBA

15:40 CEST

Poster Session 1

Poster Abstracts: 0022, 0024, 0037, 0040, 0049, 0076, 0084, 0088, 0090, 0093, 0107, 0108, 0110, 0113, 0115, 0133, 0152, 0156, 0160, 0163, 0166, 0171, 0176, 0177, 0188, 0192, 0214, 0215, 0228, 0270

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL POSTER SESSION 1 ABSTRACTS

From Australia to Canada: Establishing the Generalizability of a Brief Transdiagnostic Internet-based Therapy for Depression and Anxiety
Heather Hadjistavropoulos1, Marcie Nugent1, Nickolai Titov2, Blake Dear2,  1University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

Personalized Web-Based Self-Help for Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms in Primary Care: Rationale and Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Anne van Gils1, Jan Houtveen1, Hans Knoop2, Andrea Evers3, Henriët van Middendorp3, Robert Schoevers1, Judith Rosmalen1,  1University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, 2Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 3Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands 

Development and Usability of a Website-Based Depression Literacy Intervention for University Students in Nottingham
E Bethan Davies1, Richard Morriss1, Cristine Glazebrook1,  1The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

May the Portuguese context be a suitable context for the implementation of web-based psychological interventions for Postpartum Depression?: Preliminary results
Ana Fonseca1, Ricardo Gorayeb2, Maria Cristina Canavarro1,  1Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, 2Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

An Internet-based CBT Program For Employees With Work-related Stress
Pei-Chun Shih1, Carolina Alvarez1, Eva Rellan1, Ana Calero-Elvira1,  1Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Focusgroup interviews with Flemish general practitioners about the delivery mode and theoretical background of an eHealth intervention
Jolien Plaete1, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij1, Maïté Verloigne1, Geert Crombez1,  1Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

General practitioners' perspectives on implementation of guided internet based cognitive therapy: An interview study
Maja Wilhelmsen1, Ragnhild Høifødt2, Nils Kolstrup1, Knut Waterloo2, Martin Eisemann2, Richard Chenhall3, Mette Risør1,  1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway, 2Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway, 3Center for Health Equity, School of Population and Health, University of Melbourne,, Melbourne, Australia

Plan for integrated care for depression involving internet based CBT and video consultations in a stepped care system
Nils Kolstrup1,  1Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine, Tromsø, Norway

Evaluating the efficacy of web-based cognitive behavioural therapy for subthreshold depression
Claudia Buntrock1,2, David Ebert1,3, Dirk Lehr1, Pim Cuijpers1,2, Heleen Riper1,2, Filip Smit2,5, Matthias Berking1,4,  1Leuphana University Lueneburg, Lueneburg, Germany, 2VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany, 4FAU University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen, Germany, 5Trimbos Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Referral of Primary Care Patients with Depression to an Internet Support Group: Analysis of Beneficial and Adverse Outcomes
Brady Goodwin5, Daniel Ford3, Robert Hsiung4, Thomas Huston6, Joshua Fogel2, Benjamin Van Voorhees1, Monika Marko-Holguin1,  1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 3John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 4University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 5Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, USA, 6University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Serious Gaming for Prevention of PTSD: Development and Feasibility of Traumagameplay
Joost Asselbergs1,  1Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Internet-delivered treatment, its potential as a low-intensity community intervention for adults with symptoms of depression: Preliminary results
Derek Richards1,2, Ladislav Timulak1, Gavin Doherty4, John Sharry5, Claire Hayes3,  1School of Psychology, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, 2SilverCloud Health Ltd., The Priory, John's Street West, Dublin 8, Dublin, Ireland, 3Aware, Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, 4School of Computer Science, University of Dublin, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, 5Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, Dublin, Ireland

The Helpers' Stress: Effectiveness of a Web-based Intervention for Professionals Working with Trauma Survivors in Reducing Job Burnout and Improving Work Engagement
Anna Rogala1, Ewelina Smoktunowicz1, Katarzyna Zukowska1, Aleksandra Luszczynska3,2, Roman Cieslak1,2,  1University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland, 2University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO, USA, 3University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, Poland

European Comparative Effectiveness Research on Internet-based Depression Treatment (E-COMPARED): a study protocol
Annet Kleiboer1,2, Pim Cuijpers1,2, Heleen Riper1,2,  1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2EMGO+, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Internet Based CBT for Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: The Process of Translating, Revising and Pilot Testing an Australian Treatment Program in Denmark
Silke Stjerneklar1, Mikael Thastum1, Esben Hougaard1,  1Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Challenger - the Development and Initial Evaluation of a Smartphone Application for Social Anxiety Disorder
Per Carlbring1, Arvid Marklund1,  1Department of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden

Efficacy of a Self-applied Computerized Positive Intervention in a Subclinical Sample
Luis Farfallini1, Ernestina Etchemendy2, Cristina Botella1,2, Rosa Baños2,3,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana/Comunidad Valenciana, Spain, 2CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 3Universitat de Valencia, Valencia/Comunidad Valenciana, Spain

Blended Treatment For Depression: Treatment Protocol For E-COMPARED Randomized Controlled Trial In The Netherlands
Lise Kemmeren1, Anneke van Schaik1, Heleen Riper1,2, Jan Smit1,3,  1GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, The Netherlands, 2VU University, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, The Netherlands, 3VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, The Netherlands

"Why should I tell my business?" Teenage Focus Groups to Understand Perspectives of Pre-Depressive Moods and Evaluation of Depression Prevention Study
Daniela DeFrino1, Monika Marko-Holguin1, Stephanie Cordel1, Benjamin Van Voorhees1,  1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

THRIVE - an Asian integrated internet supported community mental health programme
Christopher Cheok1, Angelina David1, Owen Lam0,  1Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore, Singapore

Fielding Internet-Based Interventions to Prevent Adolescent Depression in Urban Ethnic Minority -CURB PROGRAM
Melishia Bansa1, Darryl Brown1, Daniela DeFrino1, Alexandra Saulsberry1, Benjamin Van Voorhees1, Monika Marko-Holguin1,  1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Promoting Adolescent Health (PATH) through Internet-based primary care intervention
Tracy Gladstone2, Monika Marko-Holguin1, Benjamin Van Voorhees1, Jennifer Nidetz1, Stephanie Cordel1,  1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2Wellesley College for Women, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Treating panic on the go: Efficacy of a hybrid online-training for panic symptoms and agoraphobia
Lara Ebenfeld1, Stefan Kleine Stegemann1, Dirk Lehr1, David Daniel Ebert1,2, Burkhardt Funk1, Heleen Riper1,3, Matthiias Berking1,2,  1Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 2Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen, Germany, 3VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 4Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Effectiveness of an Online Stress Management Intervention for Survivors of Interpersonal Violence  
Patricia Frazier1, Viann Nguyen-Feng1, Christiaan Greer1, Liza Meredith1, Kelli Howard1, Jacob Paulsen1, Therese Bermingham1,  1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Using Smartphone-based Applications (Apps) in Workplace Health Promotion: Advantages and Challenges.Using Smartphone-based Applications (Apps) in Workplace Health Promotion: Advantages and Challenges
Paul Jiménez1, Anita Dunkl1,  1University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Therapist Assisted Online Program
Sherry Benton1, Aaron Thomas1,  1University of Florida, Gainesville, USA

Can the effectiveness of an online stress management program be augmented by wearable sensor technology?
Abigail Millings1, Joanna Morris2, Sally Easton2, Christine Mohr3, Angela Rowe2,  1Un

...

Thursday October 23, 2014 15:40 - 19:30 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:10 CEST

Session 2A: Occupational E-Mental Health – A Life-Domain Specific Perspective to Foster Health and Well-Being in Stressed Employees (Part 1)
Internet interventions have proven to be effective in clinical samples, e.g., with regard to the treatment of depression, anxiety or sleep. Online trainings were also found to be effective in changing negative health behaviors, such as reduction of alcohol consumption; however, yielded mixed results for smoking cessation. While most internet-based interventions focus on specific diagnoses such as affective disorders, only few interventions were developed to address the specific needs of people in certain life-domains. The working life domain is of particular importance not only with regard to making a living but also with regard to health. There is growing evidence of work stress affecting a wide range of (mental) health outcomes. Moreover adverse health also affects work outcomes such as productivity.

A life-domain specific perspective aims at tailoring Internet interventions to the problems and needs that people face in a certain life-domain such as the working life-domain. So far, the evidence from high-quality randomized controlled trials for the effectiveness of Occupational E-Mental Health interventions is far weaker than evidence for the effectiveness of Internet-based psychotherapy.

This symposium on Occupational E-Mental Health addresses Internet interventions for employees experiencing stress at the workplace. The symposium will comprise four presentations on interventions aiming to reduce stress and related health problems (15 minutes each). There will be 5 minutes time for short questions and answers. The focus will be on efficacy. Besides presenting the results, presenters will also give an inside on how the interventions were tailored to the specific occupational settings. In a 10 minutes general discussion generic topics will be addressed that might be of importance to the further development of Occupational E-Mental Health. There will be room to share experiences in designing interventions and conducting studies in occupational settings.

The symposium will be chaired by Dirk Lehr and David Ebert.

Abstracts: 0180, 0184, 0209, 0227
 

Happy@Work: (cost-)effectiveness of a preventive web-based guided self-help course for employees with depressive symptoms


Anna Geraedts1,4, Annet Kleiboer1,4, Noortje Wiezer2, Willem van Mechelen3,4, Pim Cuijpers1,4,  1Vrije University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2TNO, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands, 3Vrije University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 4EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

Web-based stress-management training for employees: Results of a randomized controlled trial
Elena Heber1, David Daniel Ebert1,2, Dirk Lehr1, Matthias Berking1,3, Heleen Riper1,4,  1Division of Online Health Training, Innovation Incubator, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University, Marburg, Germany, 3Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 4Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Log in and breathe out: Effectiveness of an internet-based recovery training for better sleep in stressed employees - Results from a randomized controlled trial
Hanne Thiart1, Dirk Lehr1, David Ebert1, Matthias Berking1, Heleen Riper1,2,  1Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 2VU University, Amsterdam,, The Netherlands

A randomized controlled trial of a guided and individualized, web-based, stress management program for stressed managers
Robert Persson Asplund1, Jesper Dagöö1, Gerhard Andersson1, Per Carlbring2, Brjánn Ljótsson3,  1Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 2Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, 3Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden



Moderators
Thursday October 23, 2014 16:10 - 17:10 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:10 CEST

Session 2B: Chronic Health Conditions (Abstracts: 0012, 0071, 0111, 0178)
Web-based Distress Management Program for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients (WEBCARE): Long-term Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Mirela Habibovic1, Wobbe Zijlstra1, Dominic Theuns2, Marco Alings4, Pepijn van der Voort3, Leon Bouwels5, Jean-Paul Herrman6, Suzanne Valk7, Pim Cuijpers8, Johan Denollet1, Susanne Pedersen9,10, 1Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands, 2Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 3Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 4Amphia Hospital, Breda, The Netherlands, 5Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 6Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 7Vlietland Hospital, Schiedam, The Netherlands, 8Vrije University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 9University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, 10Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark

Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Patients with Chronic Somatic Conditions: Patient Improvement, The Patient-Therapist Relationship and Treatment Preferences
Sylvia van Beugen1,2, Maaike Ferwerda1,2, Saskia Spillekom-van Koulil2,3, Piet van Riel4, Elke de Jong3, Peter van de Kerkhof3, Henriët van Middendorp1,2, Andrea Evers1,2, 1Institute of Psychology, Health, Medical and Neuropsychology Unit, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands, 2Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 3Department of Dermatology, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 4IQ healthcare, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Non-use of Internet Interventions for People with a Chronic Health Condition
Thomas FULLER1, Nadia Garnefski1, Vivian Kraaij1, 1Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Automated, Internet-based Pain Coping Skills Training to Manage Osteoarthritis Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Christine Rini1, Laura Porter2, Tamara Somers2, Daphne McKee2, Robert DeVellis1, Jamie Stiller1, Carol Patterson1, Gary Winkel3, Joanne Jordan1, Meredith Smith4, David Caldwell2, Francis Keefe2, 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, 3Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA, 4EMD Serono, Inc., Rockland, MA, USA

Thursday October 23, 2014 16:10 - 17:10 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:10 CEST

Session 2C: Eating Disorders (Abstracts: 0046, 0063, 0249)
The Development of Eating Disorder Symptoms During an Internet-based Treatment Program for Patients with Binge Eating Disorder
Anette Kersting1,2, Ruth Dölemeyer1,2, Grit Klinitzke1,2, Jana Steinig1,2, Michaela Nagl1,2, Birgit Wagner1,2, 1University Hospital Leipzig, Clinic and Policlinic of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Leipzig/Sachsen, Germany, 2University of Leipzig Medical Center, IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig/Sachsen, Germany

Staying Fit Australia: Efficacy of an Online Weight Management Program for Overweight Adolescents
Joanne Williams1,2, C. Barr Taylor3, Karly Cini1, Helena Romaniuk1, Susan Sawyer1,4, Katherine Taylor3, 1Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3Stanford Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA, 4Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Association Between Craving in Food-Related Virtual Environments and Food Craving as a Trait
Marta Ferrer-Garcia1, Jose Guitierrez-Maldonado1, 1University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain



Thursday October 23, 2014 16:10 - 17:10 CEST
Room: AULAS SEMINARIO

17:20 CEST

Session 3A: A Panel Discussion on Dissemination and Commercialization of eHealth/Internet Interventions

Few would argue that there is compelling evidence for the feasibility and efficacy of Internet interventions generally.  Studies continue to be conducted further establishing the science of eHealth programs in a growing number of areas, populations, and intervention types.  Deconstruction studies are now being conducted to understand the active ingredients of these programs allowing for greater refinement and even better outcomes.  However, a major problem has emerged – how to make empirically validated interventions available once the research funding ends.  Dissemination of effective eHealth programs is the next major undertaking in the field.  Without dissemination, the research that has been conducted is meaningless.  But moving interventions into the ‘real world’ is not straight-forward and there are enormous hurdles to overcome in doing so.  These hurdles vary given a number of issues including the type of intervention, diverse laws and differing levels of government involvement and support across countries, and people’s willingness and interest of adoption.  One particularly sensitive topic that many researchers and academics have struggled with is the idea of commercialization.  Attitudes surrounding this issue appear to be shifting with a greater appreciation and, perhaps, acceptance that this may be one of the more viable paths for disseminating.  However, with commercialization, additional concerns emerge which must be addressed, including issues of ethics, data integrity, biases, and conflicts of interest.he type of intervention, different laws in different countries, government in

This panel will focus on many of the key issues in disseminating Internet interventions, particularly through commercialization.  The panelists for this session have all been working to disseminate eHealth programs and will share many of their lessons learned.  There will also be an opportunity for questions from the audience to be raised and discussed.  Panelists include Mark Willems, CEO of minddistrict (www.mindistrict.com); George Reynolds, President and CEO of Health Decision Technologies (www.healthdecisiontechnologies.com); and Simon Wilson, Clinical Director at Big White Wall (www.bigwhitewall.com).  The session will be chaired by Lee Ritterband, Professor at University of Virginia and co-founder of BeHealth Solutions (www.behealthsolutions.com).


George Reynolds1, Mark Willems2, Simon Wilson3, Lee Ritterband4,5,  1Health Decision Technologies, Oakland, CA, USA, 2MindDistrict, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Big White Wall, London, UK, 4University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, 5BeHealth Solutions, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Moderators
avatar for Lee Ritterband

Lee Ritterband

Professor, University of Virginia

Thursday October 23, 2014 17:20 - 18:20 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

17:20 CEST

Session 3B: Diabetes (Abstracts: 0129, 0222, 0242)
Diabetes Patient Perceived Usability and Long-Term Acceptance with Ongoing Technology-Facilitated Depression Monitoring
Shinyi Wu1, Magaly Ramirez1, Irene Vidyanti1, Peyjiuan Lee1, Kathleen Ell1, 1University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Efficacy of a Web-Based Intervention with Mobile Phone Support to Treat Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 and Type 2: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Stephanie Nobis1, Dirk Lehr1, David Daniel Ebert1,2, Matthias Berking1,3, Frank Snoek4, Heleen Riper1,5, 1Division of Online Health Training, Innovation Incubator, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany, 3Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany, 4Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 5Institute for Health and Care Research (EMGO), VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Blending Mobile and Web Technologies to Improve Outcomes in Diabetes
Shelagh Mulvaney2,1, Lindsay Satterwhite Mayberry3, Xian Ho1, Cecilia Quintero3, Kevin Johnson1,4, Chandra Osborn3,1, 1Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Informatics, USA, 2Vanderbilt University Medical Center, School of Nursing, USA, 3Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, USA, 4Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, USA

Thursday October 23, 2014 17:20 - 18:20 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

17:20 CEST

Session 3C: PTSD & AD (Abstracts: 0011, 0167, 0172, 0193, 0219)
Adjustment Disorders: Frequently Diagnosed and Uniquely Suited for e-health Interventions
Andreas Maercker1, Rahel Bachem1, Thomas Berger2, 1University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, 2University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland

Exposure-Based Therapy via the Internet for Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms Following Childbirth - A Randomized Controlled Trial
Katri Nieminen1, Kristin Silfvernagel2, Katri Frankenstein2, Kamilla Larsson2, Loviisa Lundberg2, Ulrika Persson2, Klaas Wijma1, Gerhard Andersson2,3, 1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 2Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

Serious Gaming in the Prevention of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): Preliminary results of a Study on the Effects of "Tetris"
Marit Sijbrandij0, 1VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

An Online Emotional Therapy System (TEO) to Deliver Homework Assignments in the Treatment of Adjustment Disorders versus the Traditional Method
Mar Molés1, Soledad Quero1,2, Sara Nebot1, Carla Soler1, Daniel Campos1, Cristina Botella1,2, 1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, 2CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Castellón, Spain

Effects of a Web-Based Intervention Aiming at Changes in Secondary Traumatic Stress and Secondary Traumatic Growth
Roman Cieslak1,2, Katarzyna Zukowska1, Ewelina Smoktunowicz1, Martyna Kowalska1, Anna Rogala1, 1University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland, 2University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, USA

Thursday October 23, 2014 17:20 - 18:20 CEST
Room: AULAS SEMINARIO

18:30 CEST

Opening Reception
Join your fellow ISRII meeting attendees at this complimentary reception, which will be held in the beautiful Main Cloister of the La Nau building at the University of Valencia.

Extra tickets for non meeting attendees must be purchased in advance for $25 (USD) per ticket.

The Opening Reception is being generously sponsored by Elsevier. 

Sponsors
EB

Elsevier, B.V.

Silver Level Sponsor
Contacts:Lisa Colson: L.Colson@elsevier.comNatalie Hill-krasniqi: n.hill-krasniqi@elsevier.com


Thursday October 23, 2014 18:30 - 20:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

19:00 CEST

Poster Session 1 Breakdown
Thursday October 23, 2014 19:00 - 20:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia
 
Friday, October 24
 

08:00 CEST

Poster Session 2 Setup
Abstracts: 0006, 0010, 0020, 0021, 0028, 0033, 0042, 0047, 0072, 0073, 0079, 0081, 0089, 0091, 0101, 0126, 0143, 0151, 0157, 0158, 0186, 0208, 0218, 0223, 0229, 0231, 0235, 0237, 0239, 0243, 0251, 0051, 0265, 0266

Friday October 24, 2014 08:00 - 09:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

08:00 CEST

Registration Desk Open
Friday October 24, 2014 08:00 - 18:00 CEST
TBA

09:00 CEST

Plenary Lecture: The Emergence of Positive Technology: Potential Applications
Information and communication technologies are becoming more present in people’s daily lives. But what is the final purpose of the mass proliferation of digital devices? Are they helpful in fostering personal growth and individual integration? The keynote will suggest that possible answers will be offered by the "Positive Technology" approach: the scientific and applied approach to the use of technology for improving the quality of our personal experience through its structuring, augmentation and/or replacement. First, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to manipulate the quality of experience, with the goal of increasing wellness, and generating strengths and resilience in individuals, organizations and society. Then, we classify positive technologies according to their effects on these three features of personal experience - Hedonic: technologies used to induce positive and pleasant experiences; Eudaimonic: technologies used to support individuals in reaching engaging and self-actualizing experiences; Social/Interpersonal: technologies used to support and improve the connection between individuals, groups and organizations. 

Speakers
GR

Giuseppe Riva

Dr. Giuseppe Riva is the Director of the Interactive Communication and Ergonomics of New Italy and the Professor of General Psychology and Communication Psychology at the Catholic University of Milan, Italy.


Friday October 24, 2014 09:00 - 09:30 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 4A: Internet-Based Interventions in the Public Health System in Spain
The Internet-based intervention field is growing all over the world. One of the main objectives of these interventions is to improve mental health care in public systems, helping to reduce financial costs and waiting lists, among other issues. The focus of this symposium is to describe the state of this field in Spain. 

Abstracts: 0250, 0259, 0260

Internet-based interventions in the public health system in Spain. Randomized clinical trials in progress
Javier García Campayo4, Gonzalo Haro2, Julio Domenech3, Rosa Baños1,  1University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain, 2Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain, 3Hospital Arnau de Vilanova de Valencia, Valencia, Spain, 4Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain

Cognitive behavioural intervention supported by ICTs for managing chronic low back pain
Julio Doménech1,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain

A transdiagnostic online program for the treatment of emotional disorders
Gonzalo Haro1,  1University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain


 

Speakers

Friday October 24, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 4B: User Driven and Empowered: The Development and Evaluation of User-Focused, Innovative Approaches to Improving the Mental Health of Adolescents and Young Adults
This symposium will showcase findings from several projects focused on the development and evaluation of innovative technology-based services for improving the mental health of adolescents and young adults. These projects are part of collective work by the Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre to explore the role of technology in young people’s lives, and to determine how these technologies can be used to improve the mental health and wellbeing of those aged 12 to 25. The Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre is an Australia-based, international research centre that unites young people with researchers, practitioners and policy makers from over 75 partner organisations across the non-profit, academic, government and corporate sectors.

The five papers presented in this symposium are based on projects that are currently in different stages of development and evaluation. One paper focuses on the development and design of a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a mobile phone app for promoting healthy sleep/wake cycles in young males. One paper presents preliminary pilot trial data on the effectiveness of an online help seeking service designed to connect young people with the right information, tools and services at the right time. Three papers relate to the development of a comprehensive virtual clinic for university students. One paper presents the results of a systematic review of the effectiveness of peer-to-peer support in improving the mental health of adolescents and young adults, with a view to informing peer support tools in the virtual clinic. One paper presents the results of a survey of university teaching staff to assess their attitudes toward recommending online resources to students. One paper examines privacy and trust issues identified by young adults as they apply to the development of the virtual clinic.

Abstracts: 0132, 0134, 0135, 0136, 0137

A dedicated website to facilitate help-seeking for young people with mental health problems: Preliminary results from a pilot RCT
Sylvia Kauer1, Julie Grey2, Kerrie Buhagair2, Lena Sanci1,3,  1University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 2ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, Sydney, Australia, 3Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Recharge app: development and evaluation of a mobile phone app intervention targeting the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle in a group of young males
Kathryn McCabe1,2, Tracey Davenport1,2, Kitty Rahilly3, Derek Chambers4, Fenella Murphy4, Jane Burns2,5, Ian Hickie1,  1The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, VIC, Australia, 3ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, NSW, Australia, 4Inspire Ireland Foundation, Cork, Ireland, 5University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Privacy and trust issues in the development of a mental health virtual clinic for university students
Amelia Gulliver1, Kylie Bennett1, Anthony Bennett1, Julia Reynolds1, Kathleen Griffiths1, Louise Farrer1,  1Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

The Attitudes and Behaviours of University Staff Regarding Online Mental Health Interventions: Implications for the Development of a Virtual Clinic for University Students
Louise Farrer1,2, Amelia Gulliver1, Kathleen Griffiths1, Kylie Bennett1,  1Centre for Mental Health Research, ANU, Canberra, Australia, 2Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Online peer-to-peer support for adolescents and young adults with mental health problems: a systematic review
Kathina Ali1, Louise Farrer1, Amelia Gulliver1, Kathleen M Griffiths1,  1Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia


 

Moderators
Friday October 24, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 4C: Primary Care (0023, 0034, 0144, 0085, 0246)

"Net-step" - A Therapist Delivered Internet-Psychotherapy for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care
Ulrich Sprick1, Martin KÖHNE1,  1St. Alexius/St. Josef Clinic, Neuss, Germany

Effectiveness in Primary Care - Online Therapy Solutions for Depression, Insomnia and Worry
Kristofer Vernmark1, Marie Kivi2, Maria Eriksson3,4, Dominique Hange3,4, Eva-Lisa Petersson3,4, Boo Johansson2, Cecilia Björkelund3,4, Marielle Ryberg1, Fredrik Malmaeus1, Celia Young1,  1Psykologpartners W&W, Linkoping, Sweden, 2University of Gothenburg, department of Psychology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 3Institute of Medicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy,, Gothenburg, Sweden, 4University of Gothenburg, Department of Primary Health Care/Public Health and Community Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden

E-Mental Health in Practice: An Australian Project Enhancing Uptake of E-Mental Health in Primary Care
David Kavanagh1, Judy Proudfoot2, Jonathan Tennant2, Julia Reynolds3, Kathy Griffiths3, Robert King1, Jennifer Connolly1, Angela White1,  1Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 2Black Dog Institute, Sydney, Australia, 3The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Real-Life Implementation of an Online Positive Psychological Intervention
Linda Bolier1,3, Francine Schneider2, Hein de Vries2, Ernst Bohlmeijer3, Gerben Westerhof3, Brigitte Boon1, Liesbeth van Osch2,  1Trimbos Institute (Department of Public Mental Health), Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2Maastricht University (CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care), Maastricht, The Netherlands, 3University of Twente (Department of Psychology, Health and Technology), Enschede, The Netherlands

Challenging the “90-9-1 Principle” in an Internet Support Group for Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care
Bruce Rollman1, Bea Herbeck Belnap1, Kaleab Abebe1, Jordan Karp1, Emily Rosenberger1, Charlene Xie1, Michael Spring1, Armando Rotondi1,  1University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

 


Friday October 24, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

10:40 CEST

Morning Break with Posters and Exhibitors
Friday October 24, 2014 10:40 - 11:10 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

10:40 CEST

Session 5B: Translation in the Digital Age (Part 2)
The second symposium will focus on the key role of eHealth in the translation process. It will commence with a brief introduction about research translation by A/Professor Judy Proudfoot, followed by 3 papers profiling eHealth projects at different stages of the translation process. The symposium will conclude with a discussion led by Professor Helen Christensen on the future in Research Translation in the Digital Age.

Learning Objectives:
At the end of this symposium, participants will:
- Understand the role of eHealth in a translation model
- Be aware of three eHealth projects and where they fit in the mental health translation process
- Have an appreciation of where the future is leading in translation and implementation science

Abstracts: 0064, 0065, 0131

The ibobbly suicide prevention app: results from a pilot randomised controlled trial
Fiona Shand1, Helen Christensen1, Joseph Tighe2,1, Rebecca Ridani1, Jane Burns3,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, Australia, 2Alive & Kicking Goals!, Broome, Australia, 3Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Targeted Dissemination Of An E-mental Health Intervention
Janine Clarke1,2, Judy Proudfoot1,2,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, Australia, 2UNSW Australia, Sydney, Australia

Depressed and suicidal statements on Twitter: An exploration of context and response
Bridianne O'Dea1, Phillip Batterham2, David Milne3, Cecile Paris3, Helen Christensen1,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 3Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO, Sydney, NSW, Australia

 

 



Moderators
Speakers

Friday October 24, 2014 10:40 - 12:20 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

10:40 CEST

Poster Session 2

Poster Abstracts: 0006, 0010, 0020, 0021, 0028, 0033, 0042, 0047, 0072, 0073, 0079, 0081, 0089, 0091, 0101, 0126, 0143, 0151, 0157, 0158, 0186, 0208, 0218, 0223, 0229, 0231, 0235, 0237, 0239, 0243, 0251, 0051, 0265, 0266

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL POSTER SESSION 2 ABSTRACTS

Mental Health Smartphone Application - A New Initiative for Mental Health Care Providers
Zhang WB, Melvyn1, Ho SH, Cyrus1, Ho CM, Roger1,  1National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

The Development and Acceptability of YP Face IT: An Online Psychosocial Intervention for Adolescents Distressed by Appearance-altering Conditions, Injuries or Treatment Side-effects
Heidi Williamson1, Catrin Griffiths1, Julia Cadogan2,  1University of the West of England, Bristol, UK, 2North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK

The Internet as a Mental Health Advisor in Germany—Results of a National Survey
Christiane Eichenberg1,  1Sigmund Freud University Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Effectiveness of an Internet-Based Self-Help Intervention for People with HIV and Depressive Symptoms: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
Sanne van Luenen1, Nadia Garnefski1, Vivian Kraaij1,  1Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Influence of Preference for Autonomy Support on Effects of Two Web-Based Physical Activity Interventions
Stijn Friederichs1, Catherine Bolman1, Anke Oenema2, Lilian Lechner1,  1Open University of the Netherlands, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands, 2Maastricht University, Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Internet-Based Self Help for Eating Disorders - Using New Technology in Standard Clinical Practice
Jonna Juniwik2, Joakim de Man Lapidoth1,2,  1Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 2Stockholms centrum för ätstörningar, Stockholm, Sweden

Internet-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Health Anxiety - A Randomized Controlled Trial
Ditte Hoffmann1, Charlotte Ulrikka Rask1, Erik Hedman2, Lisbeth Frostholm1,  1Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, 2Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) in the Analysis of EMAs in a Treatment for Childhood Obesity Treatment
Rosa Baños1,2, Elia Oliver1,2, Ausias Cebolla2,3, Iván Vallés1, Emilio Soria1, Cristina Botella2,3,  1University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain, 2CIBER Fisiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 3Universitat Jaume I, Castellon, Spain

Therapeutic Alliance in Face-to-face And On-line Interventions: Is It The Same?
Ana Calero-Elvira1, Marta Santacreu1, Marta de la Torre1, Cristina Purriños1, Pei-Chun Shih1,  1Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

The Effect Of The Contact With The Therapist On The Compliance With Tasks In An Online CBT Intervention For Smoking Cessation
Carlos Marchena1, Ana Calero-Elvira1, Rocio Prieto1, Cesar Paredes1, Pei-Chun Shih1,  1Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Dissemination through Partnerships: Working with beyondblue to Establish a Self-Help Website for Australian Children and Adolescents with Anxiety
Sonja March1,2, Susan Spence2,3, Caroline Donovan2,3, Justin Kenardy2,4,  1School of Psychology, Counselling and Community, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield, Queensland, Australia, 2School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia, 3School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Queensland, Australia, 4Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia

Therapeutic Alliance In An eHealth Program For Smoking Cessation: A Qualitative Study
Marianne T. S. Holter1, Ayna Johansen1,3, Brian G. Danaher2, Håvar Brendryen1,  1SERAF, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, 2Oregon Research Institute, Oregon, USA, 3CSMN, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Testing the Efficacy of an Automated Lapse Management System - an RCT-Protocol of a Smoking Cessation Intervention Delivered by Web and Smartphone
Håvar Brendryen1, Brian Danaher2, Ayna B. Johansen1, Marianne T. S. Holter1,  1Norwegian Centre for Addiction studies, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, 2Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, Oregon, USA

The Relation Between Recruitment Strategy And Eating Pathology In A Female Population With Subclinical Anorexia Nervosa
Paula von Bloh1, Nadine Eiterich1, Corinna Jacobi1,  1Endowed Chair for Eating Disorders and Associated Disorders, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany

Implementing A Multichannel Platform And Responsive Design to Disseminate Evidence-based Resources That Support Everyday Parenting And Child Development
Julie Green1,2, Fallon Cook1, Warren Cann1, Harriet Hiscock2,3, Rebecca Giallo2, Ross Green1,  1Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, Australia, 2Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, Australia, 3Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia

Computer vs. Human: ‘At Risk' Adolescents Contrast Their Experiences of cCBT and Face-to-Face Therapy
Theresa (Terry) Fleming1,2, Mathijs Lucassen1, Matt Shepherd3, Karolina Stasiak1, Sally Merry1,  1Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, 2Department of Paediatrics: Child and Youth Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, 3School of Counselling and Social Work, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

LIFEHACK: A Youth Centred Model of Developing Internet Interventions for Youth Mental Well-Being
Theresa (Terry) Fleming1, Sam Rye2,  1Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, 2LifehackHQ, Wellington, New Zealand

The European Project ANGELS: An Augmented Reality System for Risks Prevention in the Health Care Sector
Soledad Quero1,5, M. Ángeles Pérez-Ara1, Luis Farfallini1, Rocío Tena2, Virtudes Campos3, Eladio Joaquín Collado1, Susana Cortés4, Berenice Serrano1, Cristina Botella1,5,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, 2Hospital NISA Rey Don Jaime, Castellón, Spain, 3DIAVERUM, Castellón, Spain, 4Hospital Virgen de los Lirios, Alicante, Spain, 5CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Santiago, Spain

Usability and Acceptability of an Online Platform to Support the Self-Management of Symptoms and Promote the Wellbeing of People with Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)
Elizabeth Barley1, Abbey Cliften1, Aislinn Enright2, Gerry Lee1, Ian Norman1, Derek Richards2,3, Jackie Sturt1,  1Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, London, UK, 2SilverCloud Health Ltd., Dublin, Ireland, 3School of Psychology, Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Serious Games For Psychological Testing: Social-Emotional Skills Assessment In Children
Pei-Chun Shih1, Daniel Peña2,  1Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain, 2Alava Reyes Consultores, Madrid, Spain

Positive Technology to Promote Optimism and Positive Affect in Clinical Population
Angel Enrique1, Juana María Bretón-López1, Verónica Guillén2, Ginés Llorca3, Azucena García-Palacios1, Cristina Botella1,  1Jaume I University, Castellón, Spain, 2PREVI Clinical Center, Valencia, Spain, 3Provincial Hospital, Castellón, Spain

Pediatric Nutritional Assessment NutriAdvance a Novel Interactive Web Application
Diana Madruga1, Marcela Rodriguez1,  1Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús, Madrid, Spain

Coping Coach: Pilot Randomized Trial of Feasibility and Impact
Meghan Marsac1,2, Flaura Winston1,2, Kristen Kohser1, Justin Kenardy3, Sonja March4, Nancy Kassam-Adams1,2,  1Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, USA, 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA, 3University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 4University of Southern Queensland, Springfield, Australia

Integrating Evidence-Based Interventions into Pediatric Primary Care Practice: Blending Traditional and Digital Approaches
Linda Fleisher1,2, Flaura Winston1,3, Katherine Halkyard1,  1The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 3The University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

A Randomized Controlled Trial Of The PTSD Coach App: Linking Objective Usage Data To Outcomes
Nitya Kanuri1, C. Barr Taylor1, Julia E. Hoffman2, Josef I. Ruzek2, Eric R. Kuhn2, Jason E. Owen2, Beth K. Jaworski2, Adam Miner3,  1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA, 2VA National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA, 3PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium, Palo Alto, CA, USA

Using Aggregate and Individual-Level Objective Usage Data to Define User Engagement in the PTSD Coach App
Nitya Kanuri1, C. Barr Taylor1, Julia E. Hoffman2, Josef I. Ruzek2, Eric R. Kuhn2, Jason E. Owen2, Beth K. Jaworski2, Adam Miner3,  1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA, 2VA National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division, VA Palo Alto Heal

...

Friday October 24, 2014 10:40 - 16:40 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

11:20 CEST

Session 5A: Moving From Ecological Momentary Assessment to Ecological Momentary Interventions: Data Mining Methods in eMental Health Research.
Modern internet-based health interventions generate a wealth of real-time user-data that carry the promise to enable the development of personalized interventions that are highly responsive to in-the-moment patient needs. Log file analysis and Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) have proven to be a viable approach to tap the behavioural, emotional and social dynamics of mental health. The development of Ecological Momentary Interventions (EMI), treatments that automatically adapt on the basis of real-time user data, appears to be a logical next step. EMI, however, is still in its infancy. We have only begun to understand how to turn large and often ’messy’ datasets into clinically relevant predictive models. What is clear though, is that EMI-development requires the adoption of data mining methods that go way beyond the traditional statistical toolbox of the clinical researcher. In this 100-minute symposium, participants will learn the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of such analytical methods, through five presentations of several explorative EMA/EMI and „big data” research projects, followed by an expert comment and a plenary discussion.

Heleen Riper (VUA) introduces the theme of the symposium by providing a position statement on the need for EMI and by presenting the results of the EU ICT4Depression project, in which a team of experts from Clinical Psychology and Artificial Intelligence aimed to develop a platform for EMI research. Next, Joost Asselbergs and Jeroen Ruwaard (VUA) present results of an explorative study assessing the feasibility of smartphone-based unobtrusive EMA in predicting mood fluctuations. Third, Mark Hoogendoorn (VUA) introduces an adaptive predictive modelling framework that allows for automated clinical reasoning by combining formalized domain knowledge with individual patient data. Fourth, Johannes Smit (VUMC), reports on the use of ‘big data’ - including EMA - in mental health treatments. Fifth, Burkhardt Funk (LU) will show how eMental Health researchers can make their EMI more robust by adopting common data mining methods from the field of Artificial Intelligence. Finally, discussant David Mohr (NW-CBITS) will reflect on the presented projects, to boot up an interactive discussion with the audience.

Abstracts: 0087, 0104, 0106, 0117, 0233

Improvement of Self-Help and Blended Care Therapies for Depression by Utilizing Predictive Models Developed with Artificial Intelligence Techniques
Reinier Kop1, Mark Hoogendoorn1, Michel Klein1, Pim Cuijpers1, Heleen Riper1, Matthias Berking2,  1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany

Does Your Smartphone Know Your Mood? Preliminary Findings With Unobtrusive Ecological Momentary Assessment
Jeroen Ruwaard1, Joost Asselbergs1,  1Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Promise of Big Data for Mental Health Care
Johannes H Smit1,2, Heleen Riper1,3,  1GGZ Ingeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2VU Medical Center/ department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Vrije Universiteit / Department of Clinical Psychogology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Data Mining Applications in EMI - Challenges and Recent Applications
Burkhardt Funk1,  1Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany

Quantifying the Self, the Other and the Community for Depression Treatment
Heleen Riper1,5, Jeroen Ruwaard1, Jan Smit2, Pepijn Van der Ven4, Gerhard Andersson3, Pim Cuijpers1,  1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden, 4University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland, 5Leuphana University, Luneburg, Germany



 

Moderators
Friday October 24, 2014 11:20 - 12:20 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

11:20 CEST

Session 5C: Depression (Abstracts: 0008, 0019, 0030, 0240)

iFightDepression: Improving Awareness and Enhancing the Capacity for Self-Management of Depression with the Use of an Internet-Based Programme in Europe
Annabel Cebria1, Ella Arensman2, Gillian Karwig2, Celine Larkin2, Margaret Maxwell3, Ricardo Gusmão4, Chantal Van Audenhove5, Angela Ibelshaeuser6, András Székely7, Irina Todorova8, Airi Värnik9, Peeter Värnik9, Daniel Witte10, Diego J Palao1, Victor Perez11, Ulrich Hegerl12,  1Parc Taulí Sabadell Hospital Universitari, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain, 2National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland, 3University of Stirling, Stirling, UK, 4Faculdade de Ciências Médicas - Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, 5Katholieke Universiteit Leuven LUCAS, Leuven, Belgium, 6Gesellschaft für Psychische Gesundheit - pro mente tirol, Innsbruch, Austria, 7Semmelweis University, Institute of Behavioural Sciences Budapest, Budapest, Hungary, 8Health Psychology Research Center, Sofia, Bulgaria, 9Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute, Tallin, Estonia, 10Centre de Recherche Public Santé, Luxembourg, Luxembourg, 11Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain, 12University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

Effectiveness of Internet-based Guided Self-help for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder who are awaiting Regular Treatment at Specialized Mental Health Centers: Short-term Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

Robin Kenter1,2, Annemieke van Straten1,2, Aartjan Beekman3,2, Pim Cuijpers1,2,  1VU Univeristy, Faculty of Psychology and Education, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2EMGO institute for Health Care and Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Role of Support in Web-Based Treatment for Depression and Anxiety in Adults: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis alongside a Randomized Trial
Joran Lokkerbol1,2, Annet Kleiboer2, Filip Smit1,2,  1Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Blended Learning- Developing and Delivering Book Based Classes for Depression and Anxiety Online and via Face-to-Face Classes
Christopher Williams1,2, Ann McCreath2,  1University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK, 2Five Areas Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, UK


Friday October 24, 2014 11:20 - 12:20 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

12:30 CEST

Plenary Lecture: Internet Interventions in Spain: State of the Art and Future Trends
In the last decade, several research groups in Spain have developed different internet interventions for specific psychiatric disorders. This lecture aims to summarize these interventions, describe the problems for their implementation in the Spanish National Health Service and elucidate future trends and issues to be resolved. 


Friday October 24, 2014 12:30 - 13:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

13:00 CEST

Demonstration Presentations (Abstracts: 0015, 0058, 0059, 0118, 0124, 0261)

App-based meal diary as treatment support i eating disorder treamtents
Joakim de Man Lapidoth1,2, Ann-Charlotte Wiberg2, Karolin Lindberg2, Kristoffer Ekström2,  1Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 2Stockhoms centre for eating disorders, Stockholm, Sweden

UV4.me: A Tailored Internet Intervention for Skin Cancer Risk Reduction in Young Adults
Carolyn Heckman1, Susan Darlow1, Lee Ritterband2, Teja Munshi1, Carolyn Caruso4, Stephanie Raivitch1, Sharon Manne3,  1Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, 3Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, 4BeHealth Solutions, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Blended Care for Depression in Specialized Mental Healthcare – Results of a Pilot Study
Lisa Kooistra1, Jenneke Wiersma2, Jeroen Ruwaard1, Patricia van Oppen2, Mark Dekker5, Lisette van Gemert-Pijnen4, Filip Smit6, Pim Cuijpers1,3, Heleen Riper1,3,  1Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center/GGZinGeest and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Department of eMental-health, Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany, 4Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, 5GGZ Friesland, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, 6The Trimbos Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Mental Health Online: An Australian Online Clinic for Singular and Multiple-Disorder Treatment With Synchronous and Asynchronous Online Support
Jo Abbott1, Neil Thomas1, Klaire Wallace1,  1Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia

PROSTMATE: A new prostate cancer portal to support men with prostate cancer
Addie Wootten1,  1Australian Prostate Cancer Research, East Melbourne, Australia

Automating the research process: Demonstration of the Goji Trial Management Software
Jeremy Gibson1,  1Queensland University of Technologuy, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

 


Friday October 24, 2014 13:00 - 13:40 CEST
Room: AULAS SEMINARI - 3rd FL VESTIBUL

13:00 CEST

Lunch with Posters and Exhibitors
Join other meeting attendees as lunch is served in the Main Cloister of La Nau.

Friday October 24, 2014 13:00 - 14:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Session 6A: Implementation and Upscaling of Low Intensity eMental-Health Interventions
Internet Interventions, especially those based on cognitive behavioural therapy, have proven to be (cost) effective for mild to severe common mental disorders. Proof of concept studies show the potential clinical effectiveness of these interventions for the more complex disorders as well. The (cost) effectiveness of these interventions relates mainly to comparators of non-intervening and much less to face-to-face psychological interventions. Overall the results obtained by ample studies warrant the up-scaling of these interventions in routine practice. The reach, implementation and uptake of eMental-health interventions by patients and professionals in routine mental health care practice, however, is lower than expected given the available evidence. Several reasons may explain not only the limited reach but uptake as well. We mention the four most prominent barriers.

1. First, the evidence available has been mainly derived from randomized controlled trials that recruit study participants directly in the community and less from routine primary and specialised mental health services directly. This means that many of the online services on offer are not embedded in routine care thereby lacking both uptake and maintenance from within routine mental health care and health insurance systems.

2. Second, the reach of Internet interventions differs between low intensity interventions with no professional human guidance and those with this type of guidance. Whereas unguided public health interventions do have a high reach, their clinical impact is rather low and uptake by participants is characterised by a high intervention drop-out. On the contrary, guided interventions do have a higher impact compared to non-guided interventions but their reach and uptake is yet rather low.

3. Third, the evidence of Internet interventions in routine mental care services based on ‘blended’ treatments that combine face to face with Internet intervention, needs to be strengthened. The implementation in routine practice is rather low as well.

4. Fourth, scientific insights of health technology implementation sciences are rather slowly entering the academic domain of eMental-health research in routine practice.

In sum, the implementation of evidence based Internet interventions in routine practice faces multi-faceted challenges. In this symposium we focus on the barriers and success strategies of the implementation of Internet interventions from this multifaceted angle in terms of disorders, recruitment strategies, settings and scale (national and international).

Abstracts: 0109 , 0116 , 0127, 0148

MasterMind: Mastering the Implementation and Up-scaling of Cognitive Behavioural Internet Interventions in Routine Practice
Christiaan Vis1, Jan Smit3,1, Pim Cuijpers1,2, Heleen Riper1,2,  1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2Leuphana University Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany, 3GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Suggested Steps for Providing Evidence-based Digital Interventions Across the World to People with No Access to Health Care Providers
Ricardo F. Muñoz1,2,  1Institute for International Internet Interventions for Health (i4Health), Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, California, USA, 2University of California, San Francisco/San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, California, USA

Global health promotion and social media
Helen Christensen1,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, Australia

The Global Dissemination of Psychological Treatments: Strategies and Methods
Christopher G Fairburn1,  1Oxford University, Oxford, UK

 


Moderators
HR

Heleen Riper

Professor eMental-Health/ clinical psychology; Chair; President, Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Triple-E; ISRII

Friday October 24, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Session 6B: Occupational E-Mental Health – A Life-Domain Specific Perspective to Foster Health and Well-Being in Stressed Employees (Part 2)
Internet interventions have proven to be effective in clinical samples, e.g., with regard to the treatment of depression, anxiety or sleep. Online trainings were also found to be effective in changing negative health behaviors, such as reduction of alcohol consumption; however, yielded mixed results for smoking cessation. While most internet-based interventions focus on specific diagnoses such as affective disorders, only few interventions were developed to address the specific needs of people in certain life-domains. The working life domain is of particular importance not only with regard to making a living but also with regard to health. There is growing evidence of work stress affecting a wide range of (mental) health outcomes. Moreover adverse health also affects work outcomes such as productivity.

A life-domain specific perspective aims at tailoring Internet interventions to the problems and needs that people face in a certain life-domain such as the working life-domain. So far, the evidence from high-quality randomized controlled trials for the effectiveness of Occupational E-Mental Health interventions is far weaker than evidence for the effectiveness of Internet-based psychotherapy.

The symposium will comprise four presentations. The studies presented will focus on adherence to Occupational E-Mental Health interventions, moderators of change, the importance of guidance and the potential of Occupational E-Mental Health interventions to save costs with regard to absenteeism and presenteeism (15 minutes each). There will be 5 minutes time for short questions and answers. In a 10 minutes general discussion generic topics will be addressed that might be of importance to the further development of Occupational E-Mental Health such as improving adherence, acceptance and optimizing recruitment and implementation strategies.

The symposium will be chaired by David Ebert and Dirk Lehr. 

Abstracts: 0092, 0221, 0248

Predictors of Adherence to a Web-Based Stress-Management Intervention
Anna-Carlotta Zarski1, Dirk Lehr1, Matthias Berking1,2, Heleen Riper1,3, Pim Cuijpers1,3, Elena Heber1, David Ebert1,4,  1Leuphana University Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany, 2Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany, 3VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 4Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany

What about the costs. Are internet interventions for stressed employee's attractive measures for employer's to reduce the costs of presenteeism and absenteeism?
Dirk Lehr1, David Ebert1, Stephanie Nobis1, Filip Smit4, Hanne Thiart1, Elena Heber1, Matthias Berking3, Heleen Riper2,  1Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 2VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 4Trimbos-Instituut, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Efficacy of Minimal Guided and Unguided Internet-Based Treatment for Work-Related Stress: Results of Two Randomized Controlled Trials
David Ebert1, Dirk Lehr1, Heleen Riper1, Matthias Berking1,  1Division Health Trainings Online Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 2Philipps University, Marburg, Germany 


Moderators
Friday October 24, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Session 6C: eMental Health (Abstracts: 0052, 0183)

Outcomes Of A One-Year Text Message Intervention For Obese English And Spanish-Speaking Adults: ConTxt
Kevin Patrick1, Fred Raab1, Cheryl Rock1, Greg Norman1, Julie Kolodziejczk1, Elva Arredondo1, William Griswold1, Lindsay Dillon1, Michael Donohue1,  1University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA, 2San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA

Fit for eMental Health: An Instrument to Assess Readiness for Blended Care Treatment
Jobke Wentzel1, Britta Semlianoi1, Rosalie van der Vaart2, Lisette van Gemert-Pijnen1,  1University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, 2Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

 


Friday October 24, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

15:10 CEST

Session 7A: Virtual Reality and mHealth Technologies in Clinical and Health Psychology
The potential and utility of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for psychological treatments been demonstrated in at least the following technological areas: computer-assisted therapy, Virtual Reality (VR) techniques, and using the Internet as treatment support mechanism (Botella et al., 2012). Also, the adoption and use of mobile technologies is growing exponentially. This symposium will present and discuss examples pertaining to two of these areas: VR and mHealth.

Gregg and Tarrier (2007) reviewed the literature on the use of VR in the field of mental health from 1985 to 2006, identifying more than 50 studies referred to VR-based treatments with at least one patient. Seventeen of these studies compared the effectiveness of VR treatment with in vivo exposure, another treatment, or a no treatment control. It was found that although, in general, VR-based therapy proves to be superior to no treatment, it has not yet been shown to be more effective than most often used therapeutic approaches, such as in vivo cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Other reviews have shown more optimism about the advantages of VR-based therapy in the context of several psychopathologies, especially anxiety disorders. In general, these reviews suggest that VR-based interventions are at least as effective as those based on in vivo CBT. Nevertheless, VR has important advantages over traditional interventions because of its higher ecological validity and the higher control of the parameters of the exposure.

While enthusiasm for mHealth interventions is high, little is known yet about their efficacy or effectiveness. Most randomized trials of mHealth interventions have employed text message reminder systems. Some systematic reviews have described evidence for the use of text message reminders to improve attendance at health care appointments and medication adherence for people with chronic illnesses. Clinical trials that measure clinical outcomes are essential in this area.

Abstracts: 0252, 0253, 0254, 0256 

Advances in Augmented Reality for the Treatment of Animal Phobias
J Bretón-López1, M. A. Pérez-Ara1, M Wrzesien1, B Serrano1, Rosa Banos1, E Del Rio1, Cristina Botella1,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain, 2University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain

Development of VR-based software for binge eating behavior treatment: Preliminary data
Marta Ferrer-Garcia1, Jose Guitierrez-Maldonado1,  1University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Application of cue exposure treatment through virtual reality for cigarette craving
Irene Pericot-Valverde1, Olaya García-Rodríguez1, Roberto Secades-Villa1, Jose Guitierrez-Maldonado2,  1University of Oviedo, Asturias, Spain, 2University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

mHealth for the management of chronic pain in youth. The case of Fibroline
Jordi Miró1, Rocio de la Vega1, Roman Roset1,  1Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Catalonia, Spain

 

Moderators
Friday October 24, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:10 CEST

Session 7B: Serious Gaming & interactivity in interventions for Child and Adolescent Mental Health
Serious Gaming and Interactivity in Interventions for Child and Youth Mental Health
Convened by Dr Theresa Fleming & Professor Bruce Arroll

This symposium will provide an overview of serious gaming & interactivity in internet interventions to promote mental health among children and young people. We begin with an overview of the literature and then shift to analyses of serious gaming components included in leading contemporary tested or in-development projects in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. We shift to consider a game centred approach, where psychotherapeutic components of a commercially available and widely used game are being evaluated. Finally we will close with a panel discussion of future directions and opportunities for serious gaming in interventions for child and youth mental health.

Abstracts: 0060, 0102,  0120, 0154

Serious Games: Benefits and Application Areas for Psychotherapy
Christiane Eichenberg1, Markus Schott1,  1Sigmund Freud University, Department of Psychology, Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Designing apps for acceptability and interactivity
Helen Christensen1,2, Fiona Shand1,2, Rebecca Ridani1,2, Joe Tighe3,2,  1University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2Black Dog Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 3Alive and Kicking Goals, Broome, WA, Australia

Serious gaming aspects of SPARX cCBT
Sally Merry1, Theresa Fleming1,2, Mathijs Lucassen1, Matthew Shepherd3, Karolina Stasiak1,  1Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, 2Department of Paediatrics: Child and Youth Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, 3School of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Fielding Primary Care Internet-Based Interventions to Prevent Adolescent Depression: The tale of two Derivatives
Monika Marko-Holguin1, Benjamin Van Voorhees1, Tracy Gladstone2, Daniela DeFrino1, Lauren Anker1, Eduard Reimer1, Nikhil Nandakumar1,  1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2Wellesley College for Women, Boston, Massachusetts, USA






Moderators
Friday October 24, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:10 CEST

Session 7C: Child and Adolescents (Abstracts: 0069, 0112, 0125, 0201, 0234)

The Use of Social Media as a Method for Interventions in Residential Youth Care for Youth with Emotional & Behavioral Problems
Davy Nijs1,2, Tom Vandries1,2,  1Catholic University College Limbourg, Diepenbeek, Belgium, 2Association Catholic University Leuven (KUL), Leuven, Belgium

The Effectiveness of an Internet-Based Parent Management Training (PMT) Program Compared to Another More Advanced Face-to-Face Parent PMT
Ata Ghaderi1, Pia Enebrink1,  1Karolinksa institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Engagement with the TeenDrivingPlan and Diversity of Teens' Supervised Practice Driving: Lessons for Internet-Based Learner Driver Interventions
Flaura Winston1,2, Jessica Mirman1, Allison Curry1, Melissa Pfeiffer1, Michael Elliott3, Dennis Durbin1,2,  1The Children's Hospital of Philadelphi, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 3University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, PA, USA

Laying the Groundwork to Ensure a Sustainable Pediatric Sleep Internet Intervention
Penny Corkum1,2, Aimee Coulombe1, Katelynn Boerner1, Tamara Speth1, Christine Chambers1,2, Roger Godbout3, Reut Gruber4, Wendy Hall5, Graham Reid6, Robyn Stremler7, Shelly Weiss7, Manisha Witmans8,  1Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 3University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 4McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 5University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 6Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, 7University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 8Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Web-Based Mental Health Check-Ups for Children and Adolescents: The Specific Case of DETECTA-WEB in Spain
Jose A. Piqueras1, Mariola Garcia-Olcina1, Maria Rivera-Riquelme1, Tiscar Rodriguez-Jimenez1, Mireia Orgiles1, Jose P. Espada1, 1Universidad Miguel Hernandez Elche, Elche, Alicante/Comunidad Valenciana, Spain

 



Friday October 24, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

16:10 CEST

Afternoon Break with Posters and Exhibitors
Friday October 24, 2014 16:10 - 16:40 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:40 CEST

Session 8A: Other Mental Health Problems (Abstracts: 0016, 0036, 0057, 0099, 0204)

Development and Testing Of An E-learning Module On The Assessment And Treatment Of Suicidal Behavior
Derek de Beurs1, Jeroen Ruwaard1, Robin Kenter1, Marieke de Groot1, Jos de Keijser2, Ad Kerkhof1,  1VU Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2GGZ friesland, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands

Predictors of Treatment Dropout in Self-Guided Web-Based Interventions for Depression: An ‘‘Individual Patient Data’’ Meta-Analysis
Eirini Karyotaki1,2, Filip Smit1,3, Annet Kleiboer1,2, David Turner1,2, Adriana Mira Pastor4, Tomas Berger5, Cristina Botella4, Tara Donker1,2, Louise Farrer8, Bjorn Meyer9, Viola Spek11, Kristofer Vernmark12,13, Pim Cuijpers1,2,  1Department of Clinical Psychology, Vu University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Trimbus Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 4Department of Psychology and Technology, Jaume University, Castellon, Spain, 5Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, 6Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 7Department of Medical Psychology & Psychotherapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 8Centre for Mental Health Research, ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 9Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, 10GAIA AG, Hamburg, Germany, 11Avans Hogeschool, University of Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands, 12Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden, 13Psykologpartners, Linkoping, Sweden

eCare@home - Tablet-based Ambient Assistance For Older Adults With Bipolar Disorder Or Recurrent Depressive Episodes
Josien Schuurmans1, Jeroen Ruwaard2, Heleen Riper2,1, Jan Smit1, Max Stek1,  1GGZinGeest/VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Development and Formative Evaluation of Computerized Trans-Diagnostic DBT Skills Training for Emotion Dysregulation
Anita Lungu1, Maria Vicenta Navarro Haro1, Chelsey Wilks1, Marsha Linehan1,  1University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Internet Interventions for Interpersonal Violence
Gerhard Andersson1,2,  1Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 2Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden




Friday October 24, 2014 16:40 - 17:40 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:40 CEST

Session 8B: Internet Interventions (Abstracts: 0053, 0062, 0075, 0174)

Emerging Characteristics of Internet-Assisted Psychological Interventions: Analysis of Journal Publications 1996-2013
Azy Barak1,  1University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

A New Method for Improved Development of eHealth Tools: Expert Assessment of Content Validity
Nancy Kassam-Adams1,2, Flaura Winston1,2,  1Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Brief Online Mindfulness-Based: Replication and Extension
Kate Cavanagh1,2, Clara Strauss3,2, Alasdair Churchard1, Puffin O'Hanlon1, Thomas Mundy1, Phoebe Votalato1, Fergal Jones4,2,  1University of Sussex, East Sussex, UK, 2Sussex Mindfulness Centre, East Sussex, UK, 3Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, East Sussex, UK, 4Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, UK

A Web-Based Multiple Behavior Change Intervention: Reach, Use, Preferences, Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness
Daniela Schulz1, Francine Schneider1, Stef Kremers1, Math Candel1, Silvia Evers1, Hein de Vries1,  1Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands

 


Friday October 24, 2014 16:40 - 17:40 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

16:40 CEST

Session 8C: ISRII Throwdown!
Participants who signed up for the ISRII Throwdown! during registration will be placed in small groups to work together to conceptualize and storyboard a new eHealth intervention application. The winning group will be crowned ISRII Throwdown! Champions during the Closing Awards Session.
  • Each participant is placed in a multidisciplinary group of ISRII meeting attendees. Participants include researchers, psychologists, clinicians, designers, developers, statisticians, entrepreneurs, and more. We will have an exceptionally rich group of participants and every  attempt will be made to establish teams with a good mix of skill sets.
  • In addition to having fun and meeting new people, the aim of each team is to come up with the best eHealth intervention for the chosen disorder. 
  • As a team, you need to decide what type of technology approach you think best for creating an intervention for this disorder. It might incorporate the use of the web, mobile, sensors, VR, or any other emerging technology you determine best. It might also be one or some of the following: self-help, group focused, human supported, automated, tailored, and based on a CBT, mindfulness, dynamic, or whatever orientation you all believe would be best.
  • Your team should then work together to determine how best to present your eHealth intervention and will have 3 minutes during the Throwdown session to present your ideas. The audience will vote on a winner!
  • Your team may present it in any way you choose, whether this be via a PowerPoint presentation, poster, intervention mockup, website, video, skit – you name it! But not a moment over 180 seconds!

Moderators
avatar for Lee Ritterband

Lee Ritterband

Professor, University of Virginia

Friday October 24, 2014 16:40 - 17:40 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

16:40 CEST

Poster Session 2 Breakdown
Friday October 24, 2014 16:40 - 18:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

17:40 CEST

Plenary Lecture: Virtual Reality and Psychosis: A Review of the Literature

Virtual Reality (VR) can elicit paranoid thoughts in both patients and healthy individuals. The experiences in VR are correlated to real life symptoms and validate VR as a way of researching paranoia and psychosis. The characteristic neurocognitive problems in psychotic patients also characterize performance in VR environment. Social skill deficiencies are reflected in VR and can be addressed with training and exercises. Although research has just started in recent years, there is an expanding database on interventions for delusions, hallucinations, neurocognition, social cognition, and social skills with promising results.

VR is safe and valid and an array of assessment and treatment opportunities is emerging. The lecture will address and review the VR studies in psychosis and tentatively set a research agenda for the years to come.



Friday October 24, 2014 17:40 - 18:10 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

18:20 CEST

20:00 CEST

Museum Tour: Valencia Museum of Modern Art (IVAM) **SOLD OUT**
Limited Capacity seats available

***This event is SOLD OUT**

Experience Valencia's rich cultural history with a 1 hour guided tour of the IVAM (Valencia Institute of Modern Art), focusing on the Julio Gonzalez and Miquel Narvarro exhibits. The tour begins promptly at 20:00/8:00 PM. After the tour, grab a cocktail at the Museum cafeteria before heading to dinner. This requires separate registration. Space is limited for this event and all registrations must be received no later than Friday, 26 September 2014.

Friday October 24, 2014 20:00 - 21:00 CEST
IVAM (Valencia Institute of Modern Art) Guillem de Castro, 118, 46003 Valencia

21:00 CEST

Dinner at La Sucursal **Registration Closed**
Limited Capacity seats available

**REGISTRATION CLOSED FOR THIS EVENT***

Enjoy dinner at one of Valencia's most popular restaurants, La Sucursal. This event is not complimentary for ISRII meeting attendees and requires separate registration. Space is limited for this event and all registrations must be received no later than Friday, 26 September 2014 - so be sure to purchase your ticket early! This event is limited to 100 attendees.

Friday October 24, 2014 21:00 - 23:00 CEST
La Sucursal Guillem de Castro, 118, 46003 Valencia
 
Saturday, October 25
 

08:00 CEST

Poster Session 3 Setup
Abstracts: 0007, 0061, 0095, 0096, 0097, 0114, 0138, 0139, 0142, 0146, 0147, 0149, 0190, 0196, 0197, 0198, 0199, 0207, 0210, 0211, 0213, 0216, 0225, 0226, 0230, 0245, 0267, 0268, 0269

Saturday October 25, 2014 08:00 - 09:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

08:00 CEST

Registration Desk Open
Saturday October 25, 2014 08:00 - 16:00 CEST
TBA

09:00 CEST

Plenary Lecture: Fear and Anxiety Tackled by Virtual Reality and Internet Interventions
Anxiety disorders with a prevalence or more than 10% belong to the group of mental disorders which causes most personal and societal burdens. Therefore, practicable and easy accessible effective interventions are urgently needed for prevention and treatment. Virtual reality (VR) and internet interventions offer new and promising approaches to overcome this challenge. In addition, since VR offers new possibilities to study the underlying mechanisms of anxiety disorders with experimental but still ecologically valid paradigms, VR studies will greatly advance our understanding of the disorder leading to new treatment approaches. After introducing VR technology, I will review existing VR treatment approaches, their efficacy, and new developments with a focus on own studies. Then, I will briefly summarize VR studies on conditioning models of anxiety disorders and how this knowledge may lead to improved treatments. Finally, I will discuss possibilities to use the internet for prevention and treatment of anxiety disorders, and how VR and internet technology may merge to further improve treatment of anxiety disorders.

Speakers
PP

Paul Pauli

Prof. Dr. Paul Pauli is Chair at the Department of Biological Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy at Würzburg University, Germany.


Saturday October 25, 2014 09:00 - 09:30 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 9A: The Role of Internet Interventions in Reducing Self-Stigma and Addressing Stigma Concerns
In this symposium the potential of internet-based interventions for addressing stigma concerns and reducing internalised stigma in persons with mental and physical health difficulties will be examined. Internet-based interventions may make treatment more accessible for persons who would otherwise not seek help due to stigma concerns. In addition, internet-based interventions may help reduced internalised stigma, or the extent to which a person internalises society’s negative view of an attribute they hold such as their sexuality or a mental or physical health difficulty. In the first paper a review of stigma will be provided, including internalised stigma and it’s impact on health and quality of life. The potential for technology to mitigate the influence of stigma and reduce internalised stigma will be discussed. The second paper will focus on research involving the use of technology to reduce internalised stigma in people with severe mental illness. In the third paper, research will be presented about an innovative internet intervention tailored to improve mental health outcomes, including through reducing internalised homophobia, in same-sex attracted young adults. The focus of the fourth paper will be results from an efficacy trial of therapist-guided internet-therapy for postpartum depression. The final paper will be focused on the role of internet interventions in reducing stigma associated with psychological distress and treatment side effects from prostate cancer. This will draw on research findings from interventions for men with prostate cancer and their partners.

Abstracts: 0098, 0100, 0103, 0123, 0161 


Reaching out to Women with Postpartum Depression: An Efficacy Trial of a Therapist-Guided Internet-Delivered Therapy for Postpartum Depression


Nicole Pugh1, Heather Hadjistavropoulos1,  1University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada

Out and Online: Development, User Profile and Usability of an Online Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Reduce Internalised Homophobia in Same-Sex Attracted Young Adults
Jo Abbott1, Britt Klein2,4, Mari Molloy2, Suzanne McLaren2, David Austin3, Denny Meyer1,  1Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, 2Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, 3Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia, 4The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia 

A Review of the Internalised-Stigma Literature and Considerations for Internet-Based Intervention Development
Bronte McLeod1, Neil Thomas1, Jo Abbott1,  1Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia

Exploring the role of an Online Psychological Support Program for Men with Prostate Cancer in overcoming barriers to access appropriate support for mental and sexual problems
Addie Wootten2,3, Jo Abbott4, David Austin5, Britt Klein7,4, Declan Murphy6, Anthony Costello1,3, Katherine Chisholm5, Marita McCabe5,  1Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia, 2Epworth Prostate Centre, Richmond, VIC, Australia, 3Australian Prostate Cancer Research, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 4Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia, 5Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia, 6Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 7Federation University, Ballarat, VIC, Australia

From peer support to video modelling to undermine self-stigma: MI Recovery and development of the Self-Management and Recovery Technology (SMART) system
Neil Thomas1, John Farhall2, Cassy Nunan3, Fiona Foley1, Nuwan Leitan1, Michael Kyrios1,  1Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3Mental Illness Fellowship of Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia


 


Moderators
Saturday October 25, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 9B: Improving Accessibility and Reach: From Development to Dissemination
A key concern of the e-health community is to improve the accessibility and reach of interventions by working with members of the community at every stage of intervention development, evaluation and dissemination. This symposium shares what has been learned by three e-health research teams from working with users and the community to develop and disseminate interventions to promote both physical and mental health. The first paper describes how an international research team worked with the target user group to develop a novel approach to supporting people experiencing emotional distress, and reports findings from a qualitative study of user views and experiences of the intervention. The second paper presents the findings of a qualitative study carried out across 5 countries (UK, USA, Germany, Austria and Ireland) into user views of features of web design intended to enhance the accessibility of the intervention to people of all levels of health literacy. The third study analyses usage of a weight management intervention rolled out by public health teams to over 1000 users through workplaces in the UK, investigating how usage of a website and app is influenced by characteristics of the workplace and social factors. All three interventions were developed using the free LifeGuide open source software (which will be the topic of an introductory workshop at this conference), and this symposium also illustrates how LifeGuide allows intervention developers to easily collaborate in webpage design with geographically dispersed international teams, flexibly modify interventions based on iterative user feedback, and adapt interventions for dissemination in new usage contexts.

Abstracts: 0044, 0045, 0086

User Views Of Web Design Features To Enhance Accessibility Of Materials Promoting Physical Activity For Diabetes Self-Management
Lucy Yardley1, Alison Rowsell1, Ingrid Muller1, Dean Schillinger2, Courtney Lyles2, Lina Tieu2, Peter Schwarz3, Henna Riemenschneider3, Caroline Lang3, Gabriele Mueller3, Jürgen Pelikan4, Florian Röthlin4, Kristin Ganahl4, Gerardine Doyle5, Sarah Gibney5, Emily Carroll5, On behalf of the Diabetes Literacy Consortium6,  1University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 2University of California, San Francisco, USA, 3University of Dresden, Dresden, Germany, 4Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Promotion Research, Vienna, Austria, 5University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, 6University Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium

Collaborative Development Of An Unguided Intervention For Emotional Distress
Adam Geraghty1, Ricardo Munoz2, Lucy Yardley1, Paul Little1, Michael Moore1,  1University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 2Palo Alto University, California, USA

Usage of a web- and app-based weight management intervention within a workplace context
Leanne Morrison1, Laura Dennison1, Charlie Hargood1, Scott Lloyd2, Dawn Phillips3, Danius Michaelides1, Sharon Lin1, Tamsin Briggs1, Peter Smith1, Mark Weal1, Paul Little1, Lucy Yardley1,  1University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, 2Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, Redcar, UK, 3Durham County Council, Durham, UK



Moderators
Saturday October 25, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

09:40 CEST

Session 9C: Best Practices for Internet Interventions (Abstracts: 0032, 0067, 0164, 0238)

Development of Minimal and Best Practice Quality Standards for Internet Addiction Counselling
Michael Schaub0,  1University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Consensus Statement on Defining and Measuring Negative Effects of Internet Interventions
Alexander Rozental1, Gerhard Andersson2,3, Johanna Boettcher4, David Daniel Ebert5, Pim Cuijpers6, Christine Knaevelsrud4, Brjánn Ljótsson7, Viktor Kaldo3, Nickolai Titov8, Per Carlbring1,  1Division of Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, 2Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 3Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 4Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, 5Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany, 6Department of Clinical Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 7Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 8MindSpot Clinic, eCentreClinic, Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

From Concept to Deliverable: How to Turn an Idea into an Internet Intervention
Jeremy Gibson1, Steve Edge1, Mark Begale2, Eric Carty-Fickes2,  1Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, 2Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, Chicago, IL, USA

A National Survey of the Infrastructure and IT Policies Required to Deliver Computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the English NHS
Christopher Williams1,2, Holly Andrewes1, Carrie-Anne McClay1, David Kenicer2,  1University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK, 2NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UK


Saturday October 25, 2014 09:40 - 10:40 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

10:40 CEST

Morning Break with Posters and Exhibitors
Saturday October 25, 2014 10:40 - 11:10 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

10:40 CEST

Poster Session 3

Poster Abstracts: 0007, 0061, 0095, 0096, 0097, 0114, 0138, 0139, 0142, 0146, 0147, 0149, 0190, 0196, 0197, 0198, 0199, 0207, 0210, 0211, 0213, 0216, 0225, 0226, 0230, 0245, 0267, 0268, 0269

CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL POSTER SESSION 3 ABSTRACTS

Mental Health Smartphone Application - A new initiative for Mental Health Care Provider
Zhang WB, Melvyn1, Ho SH, Cyrus1, Ho CM, Roger1,  1National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore

Designing and developing online primary preventative solutions to strengthen and support relationships
Penny Mansfield1, Jan Mitcheson1,  1University of Sheffield APPRESCI, Sheffield, UK

Technological Innovations for the MRCPsych Clinical Assessment of Skills and Competencies (CASC) Examination: Feasibility Study
Zhang WB, Melvyn1, Shankar Rohit2, Cheow Enquan3, Ho Sh Cyrus1, Ho CM Roger1,  11Department of Psychological Medicine, National University Healthcare Systems (NUHS, Singapore, Singapore, 22Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom, UK, 33Department of Community Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore, Singapore

Impacting college students' attitudes towards computerized interventions for behavioral and emotional health
Anita Lungu1, Max Liebowitz1, Maria Vicenta Navarro Haro1, Marsha M. Linehan1,  1University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Clinicians as Smartphone Web-applications Developers: Demonstration of feasibility of application of cost effective methodologies
Zhang WB Melvyn1, Cheow Enquan2, Ho SH Cyrus1, Ho CM Roger1,  11Department of Psychological Medicine, National University Healthcare Systems (NUHS), Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 22Department of Community Psychiatry, Singapore, Singapore

The pros and cons of getting engaged: users’ perspectives on the therapeutic role of Sleepio’s online community 
Neil Coulson1, Richard Smedley1, Sophie Bostock2, Simon Kyle3, Rosie Gollanz2, Peter Hames2, Colin Espie4,  1University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, 2Sleepio, UK, UK, 3University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, 4University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Therapy labs: Improving ICBT Compliance
Sven Alfonsson1, Erik Olsson1, Timo Hursti1,  1Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Evaluation of the OnTrack Diabetes Program: A Web-Based Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management and Mood
Mandy Cassimatis1,2, David Kavanagh2, Sophie Parham2, Andrew Hills3,2, Anthony Smith4, Paul Scuffham5,  1Wesley Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 2Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 3Mater Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4University of Queensland Centre for Online Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 5Griffith University School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Effect of negative mood on information processing of online intervention: a pilot trial
Robin Kok1, Natalie van der Wal2,  1Department of Clinical Psychology and the EMGO institute for Health and Care Research, Faculty of Psychology and Education, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2Department of Computer Sciences & Artificial Intelligence, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Economic Evaluations of e-mental health: a systematic review

Tara Donker4,1, Matthijs Blankers2, Erik Hedman3, Brjann Ljotsson3, Katherine Petrie1, Helen Christensen1,  1Black Dog Institute, Sydney, Australia, 2Trimbos Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, 4VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Implementation of eCBT for Chronic Pain, Using a Personalized Diagnostic and Referral Program
Rosalie van der Vaart1, Henriët van Middendorp1, Hans Knoop2, Jan Houtveen3, Robert Schoevers3, Judith Rosmalen3, Andrea Evers1,  1Health, Medical & Neuropsychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands, 2Expert Centre for Chronic Fatigue, Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 3Psychiatry department, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Australian mental health worker attitudes towards cCBT: What are they? Are there differences? Can we change them?
Caroline Donovan1, Sonja March2, Jennie Redgate1, Natasha Boyes1,  1School of Psychology, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 2School of Psychology, Counselling and Community, The University of Southern Queensland, Queensland, Australia

Internet-based treatments, a review of their history and evolution
Antonio Riera López del Amo1, Alberto González-Robles1, Carla Soler1, Azucena García-Palacios1, Diana Castilla1, Soledad Quero1, Cristina Botella1,  1Universitat Jaume I de Castellón, Castellón de la Plana, Spain

Rationale, Design And Feasibility Of A Guided Internet- And Mobile-Based Acceptance And Commitment Therapy For Patients With Chronic Pain
Jiaxi Lin1,2, Marianne Lüking3, David Daniel Ebert4,5, Monica Buhrman6, Gerhard Andersson7,8, Harald Baumeister1,2,  1Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Psychotherapy, Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 2Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 3Interdisciplinary Pain Center, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany, 4Innovation Incubator, Division Health Trainings online, Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, 5Department of Psychology; Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany, 6Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, 7Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 8Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

Internet-based Motivational Enhancement for Problem Gamblers
David Hodgins1, Jennifer Swan1, Trevor van Mierlo2, Holly Logan0,  1University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, 2Evolution Health, Toronto, Canada

POET (Pain Online Emotional Therapy) Implemented In Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP)
Eva Del Río2, Rocío Herrero2, Ángel Enrique2, Marta Miragall1, Ana Isabel Agustí1, Lourdes Peñalver3, Azucena García-Palacios2,4, Rosa Baños1,4, Cristina Botella2,4, Julio Domenech3,  1Universitat de Valencia, Valencia, Spain, 2Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, 3Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, Valencia, Spain, 4CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Overcoming barriers to developing, testing, and disseminating psychosocial and rehabilitation interventions in a rare disease context: the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN)
Linda Kwakkenbos1,2, Lisa R Jewett2,3, Brett D Thombs1,2,  1Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada, 2Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada, 3Department Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada

Acceptability of a self-management intervention for Fibromyalgia patients using ICTs
Guadalupe Molinari1, Rocío Herrero1, Azucena García Palacios1,2, Nagore Fernández-Llanio Comella3, Angel Enrique Roig1, Cristina Botella1,2,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, 2Ciber Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CB06/03 Instituto Salud Carlos III), Castellón, Spain, 3Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, Valencia, Spain

VR exposure for trauma and stress-related disorders for city violence crime victims
Georgina Cárdenas López1, Anabel De la Rosa Gómez1, Raúl Durón1,  1National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico

Online Therapy treatment for Complicated Grief after a Violent Death
Ximena Duran1, Georgina Cardenas1,  1National Autonomous University, Mexico City, Mexico

Preliminary Evidence for the Efficacy of a Technology Based Intervention for Patients with Advance Prostate Cancer
Betina Yanez1, David Mohr1, Mark Begale1, Molly Hermiller1, Katy Wortman1, Robert Chatterton1, Sarah Flury1, Jason Dahn2, Frank Penedo1,  1Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, Miami, Florida, USA

Implementation of an eHealth application targeting survivorship cancer care in clinical practice: a feasibility study
Cornelia van Uden-Kraan2,1, Sanne Duman-Lubberding1, Femke Jansen1, Pim Cuijpers2, René Leemans1, Irma Verdonck-de Leeuw2,1,  1VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2VU University, Department of Clinical Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Exploring Perceptions of Evidence in Digital Health: Perspectives of Consumers
Linda Fleisher1,4, Flaura Winston1,2, J. Wesley Hutchinson3, Katherine Halkyard1,  1The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 3University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, Philadlephia, PA, USA, 4Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Internet-Based Self-Compassion Training Program for Self-Critical Individuals: Results of a pilot study
Carmen Wie

...

Saturday October 25, 2014 10:40 - 14:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

11:20 CEST

Session 10A: 15 Years of Internet Interventions Research: The Swedish Experience
One of the first trials in the world on guided internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy was conducted in Sweden and ISRII was initially intended to be an organization for CBT and the Internet. Since the late 1990’s the field has grown rapidly and the purpose of this symposium is to present an overview of the research and clinical implementations of internet interventions in Sweden.
Four individual presentations will be included covering systematic reviews and descriptions of guided internet treatments developed by our group for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatic disorders and clinical implementations including cost-effectiveness studies.
For mood disorders most Swedish trials have focused on major depression with trials on guided ICBT, psychodynamic treatment, acceptance and commitment therapy, and physical activity. There are also trials on Smartphone-delivered behavioural activation and blended treatments. Overall, the results show that guided internet treatment is as effectice as face-to-face therapy for major depression and one trial suggests that relapse can be prevented.
For anxiety disorders there are programs and controlled trials for most anxiety disorders including panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, severe health anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessesive compulsive disorder, specific phobia, and mixed anxiety-depression. Moreover, there are studies on specific problems such as procrastination. With the exception of bias modification training most studies show effects in line with face-to-face CBT. In addition to CBT there are Swedish trials on mindfulness-based internet treatment, interpersonal psychotherapy, and psychodynamic internet treatment.
Somatic conditions have been the target for ICBT studies for a long time since the first trial on headache in 1998. There are now programs and controlled trials done in Sweden on irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pain, tinnitus, breast cancer, insomnia, erectile dysfunction, hearing loss, and stress-related problems. In addition to the health problems there studies on pathological gambling.
Finally, there are now studies on cost-effectiveness of internet interventions and effectivess studies showing that guided internet treatment works in regular clinical settings.
The symposium concludes that there is now substantial empirical support for guided internet interventions, but that independent replications are needed as well as work on more severe mental health conditions.

Abstracts: 0179 , 0181

Treatment of depression via the internet in Sweden
Gerhard Andersson1,2,  1Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 2Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

15 years of internet interventions research: ANXIETY
Per Carlbring1,  1Department of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden



Moderators
GA

Gerhard Anderson

Professor, Linkoping University

Saturday October 25, 2014 11:20 - 12:20 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

11:20 CEST

Session 10B: Other Mental Health Problems (Abstracts: 0027, 0031, 0194, 0195, 0262)

A Randomized Trial to Reduce Problematic Use of Amphetamine Type Stimulants
Robert Tait1,2,  1National Drug Research Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia, 2Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 3Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 4National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 5entre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, 6Black Dog Institute, University of New South Wales and Prince of Wales Hospital,, Sydney, NSW, Australia

MoodGroup: An Online Group Therapy Intervention for Australian Adults with Depression
Kerry Arrow1, Andrea Chester1, Keong Yao1,  1RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Characteristics of Use of Internet-Based Treatment Programs and its Relationship to the Efficacy and Acceptance of these Programs
Antonio Riera López del Amo1, Adriana Mira1, Juana Bretón-López1, Rosa María Baños2, Ignacio Miralles1, Cristina Botella1,  1Universitat Jaume I de Castellón, Castellón de la Plana, Spain, 2Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain

The Importance of Support (Automated or Human) on an Internet-Based Intervention for Depression
Adriana Mira1, Juana Bretón-López1,3, Cristina Botella1,3, Antonio Riera López del Amo1, Azucena García-Palacios1,3, Rosa María Baños2,3,  1Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain, 2Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain, 3Ciber de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERON), Castellón, Spain

E-Health for Personality Disorders? An Implementation Study!
David Koppers1, Henricus Van1,  1NPI, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 


Saturday October 25, 2014 11:20 - 12:20 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

11:20 CEST

Session 10C: Online Assessment (Abstracts: 0043, 0054, 0055, 0159, 0257)

Evaluating the DEAL Project - A Brief, Web-based Intervention for Co-occurring Depression and Problematic Alcohol Use in Young People: A Randomised Controlled Trial
Mark Deady1, Maree Teesson1, Frances Kay-Lambkin1,2, Katherine Mills1,  1University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

How Nuts AreThe Dutch (HoeGekIsNL), a Dutch Crowdsourcing Study Exploring Mental Strengths and Weaknesses in the General Population
Lian van der Krieke1, Bertus F Jeronimus1, Frank J Blaauw1,2, Maria H Schenk1, Elisabeth H Bos1, Stijn de Vos1, Klaas J Wardenaar1, Rob BK Wanders1, Johanna TW Wigman1, Peter de Jonge1,  1University of Groningen, University Medical Center, University Center for Psychiatry, Groningen, The Netherlands, 2University of Groningen, Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, Groningen, The Netherlands

Online Psychometric Instruments for Depression, Anxiety and Related Symptoms: A Systematic Review
Wouter van Ballegooijen1,2, Heleen Riper1,3, Pim Cuijpers1, Patricia van Oppen2, Jan Smit2,  1Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Centre / GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3Leuphana University Lüneburg, Lüneburg, Germany

Online Self-reported Psychotic Symptoms And Depression Among Young Moroccan-Dutch – A Web-based Epidemiological Study
Madelien van de Beek1,2, Lian van der Krieke1, Wim Veling1,3, Robert Schoevers1,  1University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of psychiatry, Groningen, The Netherlands, 2Dimence, Zwolle, The Netherlands, 3Maastricht University, Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht, The Netherlands

An Adaptive Item Selection Method for Curtailment
Niels Smiths1, 1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands


Saturday October 25, 2014 11:20 - 12:20 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

12:30 CEST

Plenary Lecture: Thinking Outside the Box: Online Social Media, Mobile Technologies and Positive Psychology for Long Term Functional Recovery in First Episode Psychosis
Bringing about long-term social and functional recovery continues to be one of the biggest challenges in the treatment of early psychosis.  At OYHRC we are pioneering interventions targeting long-term recovery in psychosis through the integration of cutting-edge social media technologies, new psychological models and strong consumer-youth participation. Specifically, over the last 5 years a team of 25 professionals has pioneered a platform of research and a new model of online psychosocial interventions entitled Moderated Online Social Therapy (MOST™). MOST™ uniquely integrates online social networking, individually tailored psychosocial interventions and peer-to-peer and professional moderation in a single platform designed to provide a novel, engaging and safe therapeutic environment. The acceptability, safety and potential benefits of MOST™ have been investigated through a pilot study with young people with first episode psychosis. In addition, the effectiveness of MOST in improving long-term outcomes in early psychosis is being investigated through a large 5-year randomised controlled trial. This presentation will showcase MOST™, illustrate the development process and provide data on its initial treatment effects.

Speakers
MA

Mario Álvarez-Jiménez

Dr. Mario Álvarez-Jiménez is the Director of Online Interventions Research and Innovation at Orygen Youth Health Research Centre.


Saturday October 25, 2014 12:30 - 13:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

13:00 CEST

Demonstration Presentations (Abstracts: 0165, 0168, 0189, 0200, 0247)

Self-Management and Recovery Technology (SMART) system: Developing online resources for use within secondary mental health care
Neil Thomas1,7, John Farhall2,8, Fiona Foley1, Nuwan Leitan1, Cassy Nunan3, David Castle4, Susan Rossell1,7, Leon Sterling1, Emma Ladd3, Sue Farnan3, Ellie Fossey2, Lisa Brophy5, Cathy Mihalopoulos6, Jayashri Kulkarni7, Greg Murray1, Denise Meyer1, Michael Kyrios1,  1Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 3Mental Illness Fellowship of Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 4St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 5Mind Australia, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 6Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 7Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 8NorthWestern Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Demonstration SilverCloud Platform
David O'Callaghan1, James Bligh1,  1SilverCloud Health Ltd., Dublin, Ireland

Demonstration of an Internet Intervention for Adults Coping with Cancer-Related Distress
Suzanne Chambers1,2, Jeffrey Dunn2,1, Joanne Aitken2, Paul Scuffham2, Bronwyn Morris1,2, Peter Baade2, Philippa Youl2, Frances Thorndike3, Lee Ritterband3,  1Griffiths University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, 2Cancer Council Queensland, Queensland, Australia, 3University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Demonstration of an Internet Intervention for Youth with Irritable Bowel Disease
Kevin Hommel1, Jamie Ryan1, Frances Thorndike2, Lee Ritterband2,  1Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 2University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Demonstration of An Internet Support Group For Primary Care patients with Mood and Anxiety Disorders 
Bruce Rollman1, Bea Belnap1, Jordan Karp1, Charlene Xie1, Michael Spring1, Armando Rotondi1,  1University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA


Saturday October 25, 2014 13:00 - 13:40 CEST
Room: AULAS SEMINARI - 3rd FL VESTIBUL

13:00 CEST

Lunch with Posters and Exhbitors
Join other meeting attendees as lunch is served in the Main Cloister of La Nau.

Saturday October 25, 2014 13:00 - 14:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Session 11A: Internet Interventions in Psycho-Oncology: Supporting Persons with Cancer and their Families
The focus of this symposium is on online interventions in the field of psycho-oncology. This research was conducted in Australia and Canada and has the potential to inform the more widespread delivery of interventions to persons with cancer and their families. The interventions discussed focus on reducing psychological distress in people with cancer and/or their partners. The efficacy of psychosocial support has been repeatedly reported in the cancer setting. However, access to evidence-based and timely psychosocial support is often limited. Online interventions have the potential to help services disseminate psychosocial support as a supplement to existing face-to-face services. In the first paper, results are presented of a randomised controlled trial of an online intervention for men with prostate cancer (My Road Ahead). In the second paper the focus is transdiagnostic internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for cancer survivors in the re-entry phase. The third paper is on the development of an online intervention (e-TC) to reduce anxiety and depression in survivors of testicular cancer. Finally, a paper is presented concerning the development of an online intervention for partners of men with prostate cancer.

Abstracts: 0068, 0094, 0105, 0121, 0258 

e-TC: Development and Pilot Testing of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Anxiety and Depression in Survivors of Testicular Cancer
Louise Heiniger1,2, Phyllis Butow1,2, Ian Olver2,3, Peter Grimison2,4, Allan 'Ben' Smith1,2, Britt Klein5,6, Addie Wootten7,8, Jo Abbott9, Melanie Price1,2, Margaret McJannett1,2, Ben Tran2,7, Martin Stockler2,10, Howard Gurney2,11,  1The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2The Australian and New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 3Cancer Council Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 4Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 5Federation University, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, 6The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia, 7Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 8Australian Prostate Cancer Research, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 9Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, 10Concord Hospital, Concord, New South Wales, Australia, 11Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia

Wellbeing After Cancer: A Feasibility Trial of a Transdiagnostic Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Program for Cancer Survivors
Nicole Alberts1, Heather Hadjistavropoulos1, Blake Dear2, Nick Titov2,  1Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2The Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

Developing an online psychological support intervention for partners of men with prostate cancer
Addie Wootten1,2, Jo Abbott3, David Austin4, Britt Klein5,6, Anthony Costello2,7, Declan Murphy7,8, Debra Osborne3,  1Australian Prostate Cancer Research, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, 3Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, 4Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia, 5Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia, 6The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia, 7Epworth Prostate Centre, Richmond, Victoria, Australia, 8Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

My Road Ahead: Preliminary RCT results from an Online Psychological Support Program for Men with Prostate Cancer
Addie Wootten1,2, Jo Abbott4, Denny Meyer4, David Austin5, Britt Klein6, Declan Murphy7, Anthony Costello1,3, Katherine Chisholm5, Marita McCabe5,  1Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia, 2Epworth Prostate Centre, Richmond, VIC, Australia, 3Australian Prostate Cancer Research, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 4Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia, 5Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia, 6Federation University, Ballarat, VIC, Australia, 7Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Australia

RESTORE: An online intervention to support self-management of cancer-related fatigue, an exploratory randomised controlled trial
Chole Grimmett1,  1University of Southampton, Southhampton, UK

 


Moderators
Saturday October 25, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Session 11C: Smartphones for Treatment and Assessment (Abstracts: 0026, 0169, 0244)

Smartphone-Supported vs. Full Behavioural Activation for Depression: A Randomised Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial
Kien Hoa Ly1, Naira Topooco1, Hanna Cederlund1, Anna Wallin1, Jan Bergström2, Olof Molander3, Per Carlbring2, Gerhard Andersson1,4,  1Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 2Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, 3Wemind Psykiatri Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden, 4Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockoholm, Sweden

IntelliCare: Using Artificial Intelligence to Tailor Mobile Interventions
Stephen Schueller1, Chris Karr1, Susan Kaiser1,  1Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA

Mobile HIV Risk Assessment and Prevention Involving Drug and Sexual Behaviors: The RAPID Project
Douglas W. Billings1, Samantha L. Leaf1, Sabrina L. Smiley2,  1ISA Associates, Alexandria, Virginia, USA, 2Howard University, Washington, D.C., USA



Saturday October 25, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

14:00 CEST

Session 11B: Fostering widespread up take of ehealth components in services for mental health and wellbeing: Discussion of key requirements, challenges and solutions
PURPOSE: Deepen the appreciation of factors that promote routine use of ehealth in services for mental health and wellbeing.

E-mental health programs and services have now been used by large numbers of people, and effectiveness studies show effect sizes that are substantial and comparable to those from efficacy trials. However, acceptance and use by practitioners and the general community remain sub-optimal in many instances. Examples of successful service integration and research on dissemination of other innovations may identify critical elements for effective translation to routine care.

Panel members briefly summarise results of their effectiveness studies, of national roll-out of an online clinic (MindSpot), and use of Internet-based CBT in standard clinical services in Sweden. Preliminary research on Australia-wide integration into general practices, private Psychology services and remote Indigenous settings from the e-Mental Health in Practice project is also described.

Panel discussion examines features of programs, IT resourcing, service policies and procedures, marketing, training and supervision which promote uptake, and ways these features may be enhanced. It explores challenges that have been encountered with budgets and funding models, hardware, connectivity and culturally diverse contexts, and discusses potential solutions.

Throughout the discussion, reference is made to available research and to gaps in existing knowledge. Members engage with the audience and co-panellists to identify innovative strategies to optimise reach and personal impact in differing national and social contexts, through seamless integration with existing and emerging services.

Abstract: 0173

Fostering widespread up take of ehealth components in services for mental health and wellbeing: Discussion of key requirements, challenges and solutions
David Kavanagh1, Judy Proudfoot2, Gerhard Andersson3, Nick Titov4, Angela White1,  1Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 2Black Dog Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 3Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, 4Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Moderators
Saturday October 25, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

14:00 CEST

Poster Session 3 Breakdown
Saturday October 25, 2014 14:00 - 15:00 CEST
Room: MAIN CLOISTER Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:10 CEST

Session 12A: Internet-Based Interventions for the Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders and Obesity
This symposium brings together scientist-practitioners who are enthusiastic about using technology in interventions across the mental health intervention spectrum to prevent and treat eating disorders, promote healthy weight maintenance and loss as appropriate, and promote maintenance of treatment gains. Body dissatisfaction, disordered eating, eating disorders and obesity are highly prevalent and result in significant burden for individuals and society, highlighting the need for effective and widely disseminable interventions. Researchers from Stanford University, Washington University in St. Louis, and Technische Universität Dresden have been collaborating for the past 20 years to develop and evaluate online programs and universal/tailored interventions in the fields of eating disorder and obesity prevention, early intervention, treatment, and aftercare and to improve their accessibility and dissemination. As a result, the workgroups have succeeded in establishing a comprehensive programmatic line of research, developed ways to identify risk and high-risk populations for eating disorders, and developed and evaluated the efficacy of a variety of universal, targeted and indicated online prevention, treatment and aftercare programs for healthy weight regulation, eating disorders and obesity which are currently being widely disseminated both in the US and in Germany. In the symposium, they will share their latest findings and introduce ongoing research projects.

Abstracts: 0082, 0083, 0202, 0241

Impact of telephone prompts on the adherence to an Internet-based aftercare program for women with severe and chronic bulimia nervosa
Ina Beintner1, Corinna Jacobi1,  1Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany

Early Detection and Intervention of Anorexia Nervosa: Discouraging (?) Results of a Randomized Controlled Efficacy Trial
Corinna Jacobi1, Ulrike Völker1, Katharina Möbius1, Robert Richter1, Megan Jones2, James Lock2, C. Barr Taylor2,  1Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany, 2Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, USA

Using Technology to Improve Eating Disorders Treatment
Andrea Kass1, Megan Jones2, Dawn Eichen3, Michelle St. Paul1, Elizabeth Bollinger3, Danielle Ryu2, Jenine Saekow4, Elise Gibbs4, Mickey Trockel2, Denise Wilfley1,3, C. Barr Taylor2,  1Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA, 3Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 4PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium, Palo Alto, California, USA

A technology enhanced,community-based, middle school healthy weight regulation program: StayingFit Communities
Myra Altman1, Jacqueline Hayes1, Madeline Jansen3, Jennifer Lesser2, Danielle Ryu3, Andrea Kass1, Katherine Taylor2, C. Barr Taylor3, Denise Wilfley1,  1Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA, 2PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium, Palo Alto, CA, USA, 3Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA




Moderators
Saturday October 25, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:10 CEST

Session 12B: Anxiety Treatment (Abstracts: 0041, 0141, 0175, 0182)

Interpretation Bias Training for Social Anxiety - a Pilot Study
Johanna Boettcher1, Mona Brettschneider1, Pauline Neumann1, Thomas Berger2,  1Freie Universitaet, Berlin, Germany, 2University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

Effectiveness And Cost-effectiveness Of Web-based Treatment For Phobic Outpatients On A Waiting List For Psychotherapy
Robin Kok1, Pim Cuijpers1, Annemieke van Straten1, Aartjan Beekman1, Judith Bosmans2,  1Department of Clinical Psychology and the EMGO institute for Health and Care Research, Faculty of Psychology and Education, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2Department of Health Sciences and the EMGO institute for Health and Care Research, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Role of Support in Internet-Based Treatment for Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Annet Kleiboer1,2, Tara Donker1,2, Annemieke Van Straten1,2, Heleen Riper1,2, Pim Cuijpers1,2,  1VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2EMGO+, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

PAXonline: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Efficacy of an Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Intervention, Delivered with or without Assistance from a Therapist, to Waiting-List in Romanian Adults with Panic Disorder
Amalia Ciuca1,2, Mircea Miclea1,2, Liviu G. Crisan1,2,  1Babes-Bolyai University, School of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, 2The Romanian Association for Online Counselling and Psychotherapy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania


Saturday October 25, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: AULA MAGNA Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia

15:10 CEST

Session 12C: Insomnia Treatment (Abstracts: 0185, 0212, 0236)

Post and 6 Month Post Results of a US National Trial of an Internet Intervention for Insomnia (SHUTi)
Lee Ritterband1, Frances Thorndike1, Holly Lord1, Christina Frederick1, Linda Gonder-Frederick1, Karen Ingersoll1, Mark Quigg1, Charles Morin2,  1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, 2Université Laval, Québec, Canada

Comparing Outcome and Adherence Data of an Internet Intervention for Insomnia Across Multiple Studies and Settings
Frances Thorndike1, Lee Ritterband1, Holly Lord1, Linda Gonder-Frederick1, Charles Morin2,  1University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, 2Université Laval, Québec, Canada

Challenging the 1% Rule: An Observational Study of Online Community Engagement in Users of a Digital Sleep Improvement Programme
Sophie Bostock2,1, Peter Hames2, Brandon Paluzzi2, Rosie Gollancz2, Colin Espie1,  1University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, 2Sleepio Ltd, London, UK



Saturday October 25, 2014 15:10 - 16:10 CEST
Room: AULA SEMINARIO

16:20 CEST

Closing Plenary and Awards Ceremony
Saturday October 25, 2014 16:20 - 17:00 CEST
Room: PARANINFO Universitat de València - C/ de la Universitat, 2, Valencia